Research skills: Publication guide

Annotated bibliography

Below are some citations and abstracts from publications from the library’s database and Open Access publications:

Balloo, K., Pauli, R., & Worrell, M. (2016). Individual differences in psychology undergraduates’ development of research methods knowledge and skills. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences, 217, 790-800.

Not all psychology undergraduates appear to benefit from participating in research methodology classes. This longitudinal study tracked how students’ knowledge of research methods developed throughout their three-year undergraduate psychology degree. Card sorting procedures measuring knowledge of research methods terminology were repeated at four time-points across three years then analyzed using multidimensional scaling. There was no significant improvement in students’ research methods structural knowledge after a year, but there was by the end of students’ second year. Knowledge did not improve after students’ final year of study. Various metacognitive and motivational variables were significant correlates of research methods knowledge and research skills. Structural knowledge of research methods terminology appears to be developed from formal methodology training and is not improved upon after completion of a final year research project dissertation. Improving metacognitive skills and increasing motivation for methodology classes may be linked to better development of research methods knowledge and research skills.

Wannapiroon, P. (2014). Development of research-based blended learning model to enhance graduate students’ research competency and critical thinking skills. Procedia-Social and Behavioral Sciences, 136, 486-490.

This paper is a report on the findings of a Research and Development (R&D) aiming to develop the model of Research-Based Blended Learning (RBBL) to enhance graduate students’ research competency and critical thinking skills, to study the result of using such model, and to purpose the RBBL model. The sample consisted of 10 experts in the fields during the model developing stage, while there were 28 graduate students of KMUTNB for the model try out stage. The research procedures included 4 phases: 1) literature review, 2) model development, 3) model experiment, and 4) model revision and confirmation. The research results were divided into 3 parts according to the procedures as described in the following session. First, the data gathering from the literature review were reported as a draft model; followed by the research finding from the experts’ interviews indicated that the model should be included 8 components and 9 procedures to develop research competency and critical thinking skills. The 8 components were 1) Virtual Learning Environment (VLE), 2) Cloud Learning Management System (CLMS), 3) learning courseware, 4) learning resources, 5) scaffolding, 6) communication, 7) learning assessment, and 8) RBBL activity; while the procedures included: 1) Introduction, 2) Storyboards, 3) Keynote lectures, 4) Resources for Information and Communication Technologies, 5) Faculty Consultants, 6) Reflective Blog, 7) Assessment, 8) Presentation of Storyboard work, 9) Examination. Second, the research finding from the experimental stage found that there were statistically significant difference of the research competency and critical thinking skills post-test scores over the pre-test scores at the .05 level. The students agreed that learning with the RBBL model was at a high level of satisfaction. Third, according to the finding from the experimental stage and the comments from the experts, the developed model was revised and proposed in the report for further implication and references.

Slade, S. C., Philip, K., & Morris, M. E. (2018). Frameworks for embedding a research culture in allied health practice: a rapid review. Health Research Policy and Systems, 16(1), 29.

Although allied health clinicians play a key role in the provision of healthcare, embedding a culture of research within public and private health systems remains a challenge. In this rapid review we critically evaluate frameworks for embedding research into routine allied health practice, as the basis for high quality, safe, efficient and consumer-focused care. A rapid review (PROSPERO: CRD42017075699) was conducted to evaluate frameworks designed to create and embed research in the health sector. Included were full-text, English-language, peer-reviewed publications or Government reports of frameworks that could inform the implementation of an allied health research framework. Eight electronic databases and four government websites were searched, using search terms such as models, frameworks and research capacity-building. Two independent researchers conducted all review stages and used content and thematic analysis to interpret the results. Sixteen framework papers were finally included. Content analysis identified 44 system and regulatory level items that informed the research frameworks, 125 healthcare organisation items and 76 items relating to individual clinicians. Thematic analysis identified four major themes. Firstly, sustainable change requires allied health research policies, regulation, governance and organisational structures that support and value evidence-based practice. Secondly, research capability, receptivity, advocacy and literacy of healthcare leaders and managers are key to successful research implementation. Third, organisational factors that facilitate a research culture include dedicated staff research positions, time allocated to research, mentoring, professional education and research infrastructure. When healthcare agencies had strong partnerships with universities and co-located research leaders, research implementation was strengthened. Finally, individual attributes of clinicians, such as their research skills and capabilities, motivation, and participation in research teams, are essential to embedding research into practice. Theoretical frameworks were identified that informed processes to embed a culture of allied health research into healthcare services. Research-led and evidence-informed allied health practice enables optimisation of workforce capability and high-quality care.

Green, R. A., Morrissey, S. A., & Conlon, E. G. (2018). The values and self‐efficacy beliefs of postgraduate psychology students. Australian Journal of Psychology, 70(2), 139-148.

Postgraduate psychology students must develop three generic capabilities: theory, research, and communication. This is critical to strengthen the link between science and practice. The current study explored the impact of students’ postgraduate program on task values and self‐efficacy beliefs using an expectancy‐value perspective. Two hundred and thirty‐seven postgraduate psychology students (195 females, Mage= 30.98, standard deviation = 8.34) completed a survey investigating student values and expectations. Students were enrolled in a Master of Psychology (n= 90), research‐only PhD (n= 72), or professional doctorate/Masters with PhD (n= 75). A series of 3 (Domain) × 3 (Program) mixed factorial analysis of variances were conducted to explore postgraduates’ social influences, task values, and self‐efficacy beliefs towards theory, research, and communication. Coursework students perceived peers to value communication skills significantly more than research, while research‐only students perceived peers to value theory, research, and communication equally. Postgraduate students in all programs reported consistently lower task values and self‐efficacy beliefs towards the research domain. Australian universities and professional organisations are encouraged to support the development of practice–research networks to facilitate greater collaboration and stronger links between future psychological scientists and practitioners.

McDermott, H. J., & Dovey, T. M. (2013). Strategy to promote active learning of an advanced research method. Psychology Learning & Teaching, 12(1), 92-95.

Research methods courses aim to equip students with the knowledge and skills required for research yet seldom include practical aspects of assessment. This reflective practitioner report describes and evaluates an innovative approach to teaching and assessing advanced qualitative research methods to final-year psychology undergraduate students. An active-learning approach involving auto-photography was developed and implemented as the assessment requirements for a qualitative component of an advanced research methods module. The authors suggest that this student-centred active-learning exercise is a useful and successful strategy to promote the construction of knowledge.

Harvey, D., Plummer, D., Pighills, A., & Pain, T. (2013). Practitioner research capacity: a survey of social workers in Northern Queensland. Australian Social Work, 66(4), 540-554.

Strategies to build practitioner research capacity need to be developed in order to increase the research base for social work. To be effective, strategies need to be informed by an understanding of the organisational context and the social work workforce. This paper reports the results of a cross-sectional survey of social workers conducted as part of a larger study of health practitioners in a public sector health organisation in northern Queensland. The survey demonstrates a high level of interest in research. Research methods congruent with social work’s person in environment focus were favoured by participants. However, consistent with the literature, lack of confidence, limited knowledge and skills, and practical constraints impeded research activity. This study contributes to research capacity building initiatives by identifying research strengths and areas of research activity where support is required. Approaches to evidence-based practice consistent with social work and strategies for research capacity building are discussed.

Joubert, L., & Hocking, A. (2015). Academic practitioner partnerships: A model for collaborative practice research in social work. Australian Social Work, 68(3), 352-363.

Academic practitioner collaborations can further the practice research agenda of social work departments in a health setting. This article describes the development of a formalised partnership, located in an oncology social work department, which was grounded in a systemic mentoring approach that responded to the expressed needs of social workers to develop skills in research design and implementation. The systemic model promoted the development of a practice research culture and opportunities for social workers to participate in research at multiple levels. Practice research focused on the contribution of social work practice research to improved outcomes for patients and the hospital service. The partnership has supported the development of a range of clinically relevant research studies and the growing motivation and confidence among social work staff to participate in a wider research agenda.

Comino, E. J., Knight, J., Grace, R., Kemp, L., & Wright, D. C. (2016). The Gudaga Research Program: A Case Study in Undertaking Research with an Urban Aboriginal Community. Australian Social Work, 69(4), 443–455.

This paper presents the Gudaga Research Program as a case study describing the practice principles used to implement a successful research partnership with an urban Aboriginal community in south-western Sydney. This is one of few papers that address research issues unique to working with urban Aboriginal communities, in which the Aboriginal culture of the community is not homogenous. The authors argue that the relationships between the researchers and key community members and research participants underpin the research success. Throughout, the authors show that ongoing processes to nurture and reaffirm these relationships are important and require ongoing investment. A proposed practice framework demonstrates the relationship between knowledge and understanding of Aboriginal history and culture, the underpinning values including trust, respect, and reciprocity, and shared skills and communication. Examples of how these were built into the research are provided. These are important skills that have application beyond the research process.

See also the previous post on evaluating information

September PD Blog

Professional development

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

The Cultural Atlas developed by SBS is an online educational resource that provides comprehensive cultural information on the countries that Australia’s biggest migrant populations have originated from. When working with young people and families of different cultural backgrounds to our own, it helps to develop a cultural reference to inform how you approach interactions. Part of practicing from a culturally competent framework is acknowledging the impact of culture. The Cultural Atlas includes a broad range of cultural information, for example common etiquette, religious considerations and greetings.

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

George, A. M., & Zamboanga, B. L. (2018). Drinking game participation and outcomes in a sample of Australian university students. Drug and Alcohol Review37(5), 599-606.

Heiman, T., & Olenik Shemesh, D. (2018). Predictors of cyber-victimization of higher-education students with and without learning disabilities. Journal of Youth Studies, 1-18.

Hennessy, M. J., Patrick, J. C., & Swinbourne, A. L. (2018). Improving Mental Health Outcomes Assessment with the Mental Health Inventory‐21. Australian Psychologist, 53(4), 313-324.

Krakouer, J., Wise, S., & Connolly, M. (2018). “We Live and Breathe Through Culture”: Conceptualising Cultural Connection for Indigenous Australian Children in Out-of-home Care. Australian Social Work71(3), 1-12.

LaBrie, J. W., Boyle, S., Earle, A., & Almstedt, H. C. (2018). Heavy Episodic Drinking Is Associated With Poorer Bone Health in Adolescent and Young Adult Women. Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, 79(3), 391-398.

Sharmin, S., Kypri, K., Wadolowski, M., Bruno, R., Khanam, M., Aiken, A., … & Attia, J. (2018). Parent characteristics associated with approval of their children drinking alcohol from ages 13 to 16 years: prospective cohort study. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health42(4), 347-353.

Open Access Articles

Amodeo, A. L., Picariello, S., Valerio, P., & Scandurra, C. (2018). Empowering transgender youths: Promoting resilience through a group training program. Journal of Gay & Lesbian Mental Health, 22(1), 3-19.

Canham, S. L., Mahmood, A., Stalman, M. N., King, D., & O’Rourke, N. (2018). Personal theories of substance use among middle-aged and older adults with bipolar disorder. Aging & Mental Health, 22(6), 813-818.

Doñamayor, N., Strelchuk, D., Baek, K., Banca, P., & Voon, V. (2018). The involuntary nature of binge drinking: goal directedness and awareness of intention. Addiction Biology, 23(1), 515-526.

Tsirigotis, K., & Łuczak, J. (2018). Resilience in women who experience domestic violence. Psychiatric Quarterly, 89(1), 201-211.

Open access online journal

Produced by the Penington institute the Anex Bulletin is a specialty publication for workers in Australia’s needle and syringe programs (NSPs)

Useful resources

Tx! Mag is a free to download magazine about viral hepatitis which is published 3 times a year

Headspace has launched a national mental health campaign for young men called Headcoach.  Headcoach seeks to educate young men that maintaining their mental health is just as important as maintaining their physical health.  Some of Australia’s top athletes share stories, tips and advice from their own experiences to help educate young men about the importance of looking after their mental health and knowing when to ask for help.  These videos may be beneficial to show to young men to identify early warning signs and promote help-seeking for better mental health.

e-Book of the month

Out of this world: suicide examined by Antonia Murphy

This book is intended for anyone with either an interest in suicide or suicidal behaviour. It is not aimed solely at the professional psychotherapist but at a broad range of professionals who encounter suicidal people in their work. It is also intended for those of us who have been touched by suicide personally. The book approaches suicide from the point of view of the suicidal state of mind and is intended to help us understand more about this condition. In its essence suicide is examined as a largely unconscious aggressive act having its roots in a perceived or real experience of thwarted childhood needs. The wounds of the suicidal person are often long held and deep. The suicidal person is pursued by haunting losses and the suicidal act comes from deep disturbance created by this and from the idea of death as an acting out of some form of suicidal fantasy. The quasi delusional and split quality of the act is examined – namely that suicide is both an act for and against the self (from publisher).

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

7 September, 8:30-16:00. AOD Clinical Assessment at Townsville. Prerequisite online induction module 4.

10 September, 9:00-16:30. Introduction to Withdrawal Management at Ipswich (Goodna)

11 September, 9:00-16:30. Advanced Harm Reduction at the Gold Coast (Southport)

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Attend – conferences 

NDARC 2018 Annual Research Symposium: Clinical, Community and Policy Responses to Emerging Problems in Drug and Alcohol Use. October 8, 08:30-18:15 at UNSW, Sydney. Cost $275. For more details and registration click here

2018 NDRI Annual Symposium: Alcohol and Other Drug Research, Policy and Practice, November 22, 08:30-17:00 at Melbourne. Cost from $210. For more details and registration click here

Listen – podcasts, webinars

Podsocs: podcasts for social workers. An initiative of the School of Human Services and Social Work, Griffith University that consists of up-to-the minute research, diverse and sometimes controversial perspectives on social phenomena and focus on knowledge and skills needed in the human services.

Insight webinars. Wednesdays, 10:00-11:00 AEST

September 5: Domestic violence and its relationship with alcohol and drug abuse. Findings from the Queensland Death and Homicide Review board

September 12: Past, present and future in the regulation of prescription opioids

September 19: Testing times. Drug checking in the UK with “The Loop”

September 26: Opioids, scaling up the analgesic ladder wrong by wrong

August PD Blog

Professional development

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

Youth alcohol and other drugs learning hub for workers provides access to free self-directed learning modules

Read – professional reading  

Available from the library database

Atkinson, J. A., Prodan, A., Livingston, M., Knowles, D., O’Donnell, E., Room, R., … & Wiggers, J. (2018). Impacts of licensed premises trading hour policies on alcohol‐related harms. Addiction.

Couto E Cruz, C., Salom, C., Maravilla, J., & Alati, R. (2018). Mental and physical health correlates of discrimination against people who inject drugs: A Systematic Review. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 79(3), 350-360.

Geia, L., Broadfield, K., Grainger, D., Day, A., & Watkin‐Lui, F. (2018). Adolescent and young adult substance use in Australian Indigenous communities: a systematic review of demand control program outcomes. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 42(3), 254-261.

Hawke, L. D., Koyama, E., & Henderson, J. (2018). Cannabis use, other substance use, and co-occurring mental health concerns among youth presenting for substance use treatment services: Sex and age differences. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 91, 12-19.

McKetin, R., Lubman, D. I., Baker, A., Dawe, S., Ross, J., Mattick, R. P., & Degenhardt, L. (2018). The relationship between methamphetamine use and heterosexual behaviour: evidence from a prospective longitudinal study. Addiction.

Whiteside, M., MacLean, S., Callinan, S., Marshall, P., Nolan, S., & Tsey, K. (2018). Acceptability of an Aboriginal wellbeing intervention for supporters of people using methamphetamines. Australian Social Work, 1-9.

Open Access Articles

Moss, M. J., Warrick, B. J., Nelson, L. S., McKay, C. A., Dubé, P. A., Gosselin, S., … & Stolbach, A. I. (2018). ACMT and AACT position statement: preventing occupational fentanyl and fentanyl analog exposure to emergency responders. Clinical Toxicology, 56(4), 297-300.

Mustonen, A., Niemelä, S., Nordström, T., Murray, G. K., Mäki, P., Jääskeläinen, E., & Miettunen, J. (2018). Adolescent cannabis use, baseline prodromal symptoms and the risk of psychosis. The British Journal of Psychiatry, 212(4), 227-233.

Thompson, T. P., Taylor, A. H., Wanner, A., Husk, K., Wei, Y., Creanor, S., … & Wallace, G. (2018). Physical activity and the prevention, reduction, and treatment of alcohol and/or substance use across the lifespan (The PHASE review): protocol for a systematic review. Systematic Reviews, 7(1), 9.

Young, J. T., Heffernan, E., Borschmann, R., Ogloff, J. R., Spittal, M. J., Kouyoumdjian, F. G., … & Kinner, S. A. (2018). Dual diagnosis of mental illness and substance use disorder and injury in adults recently released from prison: a prospective cohort study. The Lancet Public Health, 3(5), e237-e248.

Open access online journal

QNADA Focus: The latest edition focusses on LGBTIQ+ issues

Useful resources

Psychology tools – the library has just purchased Professional Team Membership for HOA  to the leading online resource for therapy tools.

Overview of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Status Report 2017

NHRMC Comorbidity newletter New Horizons includes an article on developing a culturally appropriate AOD prevention program for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander young people.

Positive choices This contains resources including factsheets and videos about AOD use in youth aimed at teachers, youth and parents. There are also resources specific to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and youth that are Culturally and Linguistically Diverse

CleanM8 provides digital tools to provide support for those suffering from addiction, along with their significant others and clinicians, particularly in regional areas. It has been developed by the University of Newcastle

Lowitja Institute provides access to free e-books and reports pertaining to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research

 

e-Book of the month

Helping Male Survivors Of Sexual Violation To Recover : An Integrative Approach – Stories From Therapy  by Sarah Van Gogh

Placing the experiences of men at the heart of this book, Sarah Van Gogh outlines an integrative approach to effective therapeutic treatment of male sexual abuse. In a culture where to be male is often to be expected to embody strength, power and being in control, male victims of sexual abuse can be particularly challenging to help. This book outlines seven composite detailed case studies representing men from a wide range of backgrounds and demographics. It lays out how the author’s pioneering model of an integrative approach which includes psychodynamic, humanistic, relational, cognitive/behavioural, body-based and arts-based approaches can offer an effective model for working with this client group. This key text provides a valuable resource for all those working with male survivors of sexual abuse.

(copied from EBSCO site)

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training sessions including:

1st August, 09:00-16:30 – AOD Crash Course at St George

2nd August, 08:30-12:30 – Crystal Clear: Responding to Methamphetamine Use at St George

2nd August, 13:00-16:30 – Brief Interventions at St George

9th August, 09:00-16:30 – Advanced Harm Reduction at Toowoomba

10th August, 09:00-16:30 – Introduction to Withdrawal Management at Toowoomba

16th August, 09:00-16:30 – Introduction to Withdrawal Management at the Gold Coast

23rd August, 09:00-16:30 – AOD Crash Course at Ipswich

 

30th August, 09:00-16:30- Advanced Harm Reduction at the Sunshine Coast

Attend – conferences 

The 16th Annual Conference for the Australia & New Zealand Academy for Eating Disorders will be taking place at the Melbourne Convention Centre on the 3rd & 4th of August, 2018. The theme for  this year will be Courageous Conversations: Furthering Understanding, Embracing Change. See the conference website:  http://conference.2018.anzaed.org.au for more info and details on how to register.  Cost $100-660

Write – presentations and papers

Call for papers: Australian Social Work  – Working with involuntary clients. Guidelines available here.

Listen – podcasts, webinars

Insight presentation recordings available now here

LGBTIQ young people share their stories on the podcast “Hear and queer

Assessed learning – short courses, certificates, diplomas, bachelors, post-grad

Lighthouse resourses

6th August: Assessing family dynamics: cost  $245

29th-31st August: Introduction to a strengths approach: cost $660

Workshop Venue: Lighthouse Resources Upstairs Training Room, Kyabra Street RUNCORN, QLD. 4113

Moss, M. J., Warrick, B. J., Nelson, L. S., McKay, C. A., Dubé, P. A., Gosselin, S., … & Stolbach, A. I. (2018). ACMT and AACT position statement: preventing occupational fentanyl and fentanyl analog exposure to emergency responders. Clinical Toxicology, 56(4), 297-300.Moss, M. J., Warrick, B. J., Nelson, L. S., McKay, C. A., Dubé, P. A., Gosselin, S., … & Stolbach, A. I. (2018). ACMT and AACT position statement: preventing occupational fentanyl and fentanyl analog exposure to emergency responders. Clinical Toxicology, 56(4), 297-300.

May PD

Professional development

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Geerlings, L. R., Thompson, C. L., Bouma, R., & Hawkins, R. (2018). Cultural Competence in Clinical Psychology Training: A Qualitative Investigation of Student and Academic Experiences. Australian Psychologist, 53(2), 161-170.

Massey, S. H., Newmark, R. L., & Wakschlag, L. S. (2018). Explicating the role of empathic processes in substance use disorders: A conceptual framework and research agenda. Drug And Alcohol Review, 37(3), 316-332.

Rychert, M., Wilkins, C., Parker, K., & Witten, K. (2018). Are government‐approved products containing new psychoactive substances perceived to be safer and more socially acceptable than alcohol, tobacco and illegal drugs? Findings from a survey of police arrestees in New Zealand. Drug And Alcohol Review, 37(3), 406-413.

Torgerson, C. N., Love, H. A., & Vennum, A. (2018). The buffering effect of belonging on the negative association of childhood trauma with adult mental health and risky alcohol use. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 88, 44-50.

Wendt, D. C., & Gone, J. P. (2018). Complexities with group therapy facilitation in substance use disorder specialty treatment settings. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 88(1), 9-17.

Open Access Articles

Dembo, R., Faber, J., Cristiano, J., Wareham, J., Krupa, J. M., Schmeidler, J., & Terminello, A. (2018). Family Problems, Mental Health and Trauma Experiences of Justice-Involved Youth. Medical Research Archives, 6(1).

Maremmani, A. G., Maiello, M., Carbone, M. G., Pallucchini, A., Brizzi, F., Belcari, I., … & Maremmani, I. (2018). Towards a psychopathology specific to Substance Use Disorder: Should emotional responses to life events be included?. Comprehensive psychiatry, 80, 132-139.

Olney, S. (2018). Should Love Conquer Evidence in Policy‐Making? Challenges in Implementing Random Drug‐Testing of Welfare Recipients in Australia. Australian Journal of Public Administration, 77(1), 114-119.

Rossen, I., Pettigrew, S., Jongenelis, M., Stafford, J., Wakefield, M., and Chikritzhs, T. (2017). Evidence on the nature and extent of alcohol promotion and the consequences for young people’s alcohol consumption. Report prepared for the Mental Health Commission by the WA Cancer Prevention Research Unit, Curtin University School of Psychology and Speech Pathology, Perth, Western Australia.

Wiktorsson, S., Rydberg Sterner, T., Mellqvist Fässberg, M., Skoog, I., Ingeborg Berg, A., Duberstein, P., … & Waern, M. (2018). Few Sex Differences in Hospitalized Suicide Attempters Aged 70 and Above. International journal of environmental research and public health, 15(1), 141.

Open access online journal

NADA Advocate: published 4 times a years raises issues in the NSW non-government AOD sector

Open access textbooks

Lawrence, R.J. (2016). Professional Social Work in Australia

Useful resources

Language does it matter?

Produced by NADA and intended for the AOD sector, this resource provides best practice guidelines on the use of language to empower clients.

Inroads program:

Researchers from UNSW and Macquarie University developed the inroads program for young adults with concerns about their anxiety and drinking.

Over five online modules, the program will help the participant develop new skills to encourage them to think about their use of alcohol and overcome anxiety. They will be encouraged to set goals and stick to their choices. The modules are completed weekly and they will also receive phone/ email support from an experienced psychologist (copied from Inroads website)

Drug and Alcohol Research Connections Newsletter:

A joint publication of the collaborative network of alcohol and other drug research centres; National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre (NDARC) at UNSW; National Drug Research Institute (NDRI) at Curtin University; and National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA) at Flinders University

NIDA Notes:

A monthly newsletter about drug abuse research. Articles this month include:

Long term marijuana use is associated with health problems in later life

Stressful experiences affect likelihood of remission of drug dependence, continued drug use and relapse

Substance use disorders are associated with major medical illnesses and mortality risk in a large integrated health care system

e-Book of the month

Karter, E. (2013). Women and Problem Gambling : Therapeutic Insights Into Understanding Addiction and Treatment. New York: Routledge.

Addiction is much misunderstood. Women and addictive gambling even more so, and for many years women have suffered in silence. This book explores how lonely, troubled lives and damaging relationships lead to the trap of problem gambling, the anxiety and chaos whilst locked inside, and then offers realistic hope of a way out. With the significant increase in women gambling problematically, Women and Problem Gambling aims to answer the often asked question who is to blame. The text covers: the role of the gambling industry the role of society women’s relationships with others and themselves what hitting rock bottom truly is. Case studies illustrate how gambling begins as harmless escapism and how stressful and sometimes painful lives, combined with spiralling debts, lead to desperation to avoid thoughts, feelings and the reality of life in chaos. Women can, and do, stop gambling, and the author shares anecdotes from patients, and discusses therapeutic models and practical strategies to demonstrate how this is possible. Women and Problem Gambling is based on the author’s research and theories developed throughout her extensive practice. The insights will be of value to anyone wanting to understand or work with problem gambling in women; from a woman with a problem herself, thorough to family, friends and any healthcare professionals or therapists involved in her care and treatment. (Description from EBSCO)

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

More information and to register here

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit http://www.insightqld.org/

 

LGBTIQ+ inclusive practice training for the AOD sector

Attend – conferences 

MyPHN Conference 2018

1-2 September, Mackay Entertainment and Convention Centre

Hosted by North Queensland Primary Health Network, this conference will bring together professionals from many streams to discuss ways to work together to improve services and outcomes

Registration $200-225

The Walk on the Wild Side (WOWS) Symposium is a one day annual convention held for people working in the AOD sector

11 May 2018, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital.

Registration: $100-150

Write – presentations and papers

MyPHN Conference

Research findings and innovative new ideas which can inform policy, directly influence practice, inspire future research, health reform and add to the Primary Health Care (PHC) evidence base. As a contribution to fostering this impact, the Call for Abstracts asks authors to consider the contribution their work makes to policy, practice and/or research.

You can submit an abstract for the following:

• 15 minute concurrent poster presentation (10 minute presentation/5 minute Q&A)

• 20 minute concurrent plenary session

The Program Committee invites authors to submit abstracts for presentation within the program of MyPHN 2018. Submissions are sought for oral and poster presentations and can be made via the Abstract Submission Portal.

All abstracts must follow the abstract template and be submitted online by 14 June 2018. Please note that the closing date for abstract submissions will not be extended. (copied from MyPHN)

Listen – podcasts, webinars

Managing the physical health of people with co-occurring mental and substance use disorders

Insight webinars:

All at 10:00 AEST

Insight presentation recordings available now on YouTube

Assessed learning – short courses, certificates, diplomas, bachelors, post-grad

Electronic tools for use in the continuum of care for patients with addictions

This is a self-paced online course (registration with IRETA required but is free) about the use of technology throughout the continuum of care for patients with addiction. The five sections will introduce you to five different electronic tools that can be used in prevention, treatment, and aftercare.

Through this training, discover new ways to screen for drug and alcohol use, learn how technology can support cognitive behavioural therapy, and become familiar with other relevant substance use research. (copied from IRETA website)

National comorbidity guidelines free online training and website

The training program consists of 10 training modules that can be completed in any order. Registrants can choose which modules to engage in based on interest and experience. Those wishing to receive a certificate of completion must complete all modules (in any order) and successfully complete all quizzes.

At the end of each module, registrants will be presented with a quiz. All questions must be answered correctly before the module is completed, but there is no limit to how many times the quiz can be taken. Incorrect answers will refer participants to relevant sections of the Guidelines website.

At the completion of all modules, training participants will receive a certificate of completion