November PD Blog

Professional development

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

The Lowitja Institute is Australia’s national institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research.

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Glassner, S. D., & Cho, S. (2018). Bullying victimization, negative emotions, and substance use: utilizing general strain theory to examine the undesirable outcomes of childhood bullying victimization in adolescence and young adulthood. Journal of Youth Studies, 1-18.

Kelly, P. J., Robinson, L. D., Baker, A. L., Deane, F. P., Osborne, B., Hudson, S., & Hides, L. (2018). Quality of life of individuals seeking treatment at specialist non-government alcohol and other drug treatment services: A latent class analysis. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 94, 47-54.

Mullins, C., & Khawaja, N. G. (2018). Non‐Indigenous Psychologists Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People: Towards Clinical and Cultural Competence. Australian Psychologist, 53(5), 394-404.

Raubenheimer, J. E., & Barratt, M. J. (2018). Digital era drug surveillance: Quo vadis, Australia?. Drug and alcohol review, 37(6), 693-696.

Shono, Y., Ames, S. L., Edwards, M. C., & Stacy, A. W. (2018). The Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index for Adolescent Alcohol and Drug Problems: A Comprehensive Modern Psychometric Study. Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, 79(4), 658-663.

Silins, E., John Horwood, L., Najman, J. M., Patton, G. C., Toumbourou, J. W., Olsson, C. A., … & Boden, J. M. (2018). Adverse adult consequences of different alcohol use patterns in adolescence: An integrative analysis of data to age 30 years from four Australasian cohorts. Addiction113 (10), 1811-1825 

Open Access Articles

Gray D, Cartwright K, Stearne A, Saggers S, Wilkes E, Wilson M (2018) Review of the harmful use of alcohol among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet.

Han, X., He, Y., Bi, G.H., et al. CB1 receptor activation on VgluT2-expressing glutamatergic neurons underlies Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC)-induced aversive effects in mice. Sci Rep 7(1):12315, 2017.

Kiluk, B.D., Nich, C., Buck, M.B., et al. Randomized clinical trial of computerized and clinician-delivered CBT in comparison with standard outpatient treatment for substance use disorders: Primary within-treatment and follow-up outcomes. Am J Psychiatry, 2018 May 24:appiajp201817090978. doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.17090978. [Epub ahead of print]

Weinberger, A.H., Platt, J., Esan, H., et al. Cigarette smoking is associated with increased risk of substance use disorder relapse: A nationally representative, prospective longitudinal investigation. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 78(2):e152-e160, 2017.

Open access online journal

Addictive behaviors is an international peer-reviewed journal publishing high quality human research on addictive behaviors and disorders since 1975.

e-Book of the month

Mignon, S. I. (2015). Substance Abuse Treatment : Options, Challenges, and Effectiveness. New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company.

The first compendium of all substance abuse treatment options with a focus on best practices. This is the first compendium of the entire range of options available for treating substance abuse, with a focus on effectiveness. The book synthesizes treatment approaches from medicine, psychology, sociology, and social work, and investigates regimens that range from brief interventions to the most intensive and expensive types of inpatient treatment programs. It examines controversies over best practices in substance treatment and closely analyzes current research findings and their applicability for improving substance abuse treatment in the future. Written for both academics and clinicians, the book translates complex research findings into an easily understandable format. Substance Abuse Treatment examines the circumstances under which a treatment is considered effective and how effectiveness is measured. It discusses treatment goals and looks at the importance of client motivation in positive treatment outcomes. A great variety of inpatient and outpatient treatment options are examined, as are self-help programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous. This segues to a discussion of the changing role of self-help programs in treatment. The text also analyzes changes in the substance abuse treatment industry that make treatment more costly and less available to those without financial resources. It gives special attention to the treatment of diverse populations, those with co-occurring disorders, and criminal justice populations. National, state, and local prevention efforts are covered as well as substance abuse prevention and future issues in treatment. The book is intended for undergraduate and graduate substance abuse courses in all relevant areas of study. In addition, it will be an important reference for substance abuse clinicians and other health professionals who treat patients with substance abuse issues.Key Features:Comprises a comprehensive, up-to-date, and practical guide to the field of substance abuse treatment and its efficacy Synthesizes treatment approaches from medicine, psychology, sociology, and social work Investigates all regimens ranging from brief interventions to intensive inpatient treatment programs, from outpatient to 12-step programs Explores the changing role of self-help programs in treatment Includes chapters on substance abuse treatment with special populations including children/adolescents, women, older adults, and criminal offenders (from EBSCO site).

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Useful resources

Opioid Check is a package of free tools, e-learning, videos and other resources designed for Queensland-based health and community service workers who engage with people who use opioids. Insight also have a range of other toolkits available to use including Meth Check, First Nations AOD and Dual Diagnosis.

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Introduction to motivational interviewing (Prerequisite online induction material, module 5): Brisbane, 01/11/2018; Bundaberg, 07/11/2018; Cairns, 23/11/2018

AOD relapse prevention and management (Prerequisite online induction material, module 6):  Townsville, 02/11/2018, Bundaberg, 08/11/2018; Gold Coast, 22/11/2018; Cairns, 30/11/2018

The problem gambling severity index (PGSI): a screen for problem gambling in AOD and mental health populations: Brisbane, 08/11/2018

Understanding psychoactive drugs (Prerequisite online induction material, module 2) : Cairns, 09/11/2018

AOD crash course: introduction to working with people who use substances: Cairns, 13/11/2018; Townsville, 27/11/2018

Sensory approaches for AOD practice: Brisbane, 13/11/2018

Introduction to withdrawal management: Bundaberg, 14/11/2018

An introduction to mindfulness in AOD (2 days): Brisbane, 15/11/2018

Advanced harm reduction (Participants must have completed Insight’s “Understanding Psychoactive Drugs” workshop or be an existing employee of an AOD or Mental Health service to be eligible for this workshop): Bundaberg, 15/11/2018

AOD clinical assessment (Prerequisite online induction material, module 4): Cairns, 16/11/2018

Micro-counselling skills and brief interventions: Brisbane, 20/11/2018

NIDA

Assessment and Treatment of Adolescent Marijuana Abuse and Dependence is a self-paced online course presented jointly by NIDA Notes and IRETA.

The activities should take about one hour to complete.

As you navigate the course, you’ll learn to identify the relationship between adolescents and sensation seeking/impulsivity. This connection is associated with the escalation of substance use. Students will become familiar with the screening tools that can detect and assess teens’ marijuana use, then explore new approaches to interventions and aftercare.

Listen – podcasts, webinars

The Drug Classroom is an interview style podcast that provides in depth discussions on a range of topics relating alcohol and other drugs including pharmacology, pharmacotherapy, drug policy and user experiences. The people interviewed in the podcast range from journalists, activists, psychotherapists, researchers and family members. Some of the topics covered include harm reduction for MDMA, opioid risks and problematic prescribing.

Dovetail is producing a series of short videos describing how workers can match their AOD interventions to a young person’s readiness to make a change.  The first video explains the Stages of Change model. In the early 1980s, researchers Prochaska and DiClemente developed the Transtheoretical model or ‘stages of change’ as it is better known. The stages of change model is a useful guide for understanding and exploring the process of change and can be used to tailor and match interventions that are person-centred and meaningful.

 

Non-suicidal self-injury

 

Webinars

NHMRC

27/11/2018 at 15:30 (AEST): Prevention and early intervention of mental illness and substance use: Building the architecture for change. Presented by Prof. Maree Teesson.

Insight

Wednesdays, 10:00-11:00 (AEST)

07/11/2018: Steroids: what are the risks and how do we reduce them?

14/11/2018: Managing pain in opioid dependent patients

21/11/2018: Portugal and beyond – alternatives to the war on drugs

Insight presentation recordings available now on YouTube

Write

Australian Social Work

The theme of this Special Issue of Australian Social Work is strategies for working with involuntary and resistant clients. Social workers work with involuntary clients and those who are resistant to decisions made on their behalf, in a wide range of fields in policy and practice including: child welfare; corrections; family services; health and mental health; substance use or abuse, or both; domestic violence; aged care; and school welfare.

The Guest Editors for this Special Issue are: Professor Chris Trotter, Social Work Department, Monash University (); Professor Emeritus Ronald Rooney, Social Work Department, University of Minnesota (); and Professor Traci LaLiberte, Social Work Department, University of Minnesota, (), all of whom are well-known for their work with involuntary clients.

In May 2018, a conference on this theme was held at the Monash Centre in Prato, Italy. While delegates who presented papers at this conference have been invited to submit papers, this is an open invitation. All those interested in the themes of the Special Issue are encouraged to submit papers.

Relevant papers would address: work with involuntary clients in the range of fields referred to above; strategies for working with the involuntary, mandated, non-voluntary or resistant clients in a variety of settings; the dynamics of working with this population; the importance of building relationships; problem solving with involuntary clients; challenging involuntary clients; practice skills specific to these groups.

Guidelines for submission

Authors may submit an original article (4000–6000 words), or a Practice, Policy, and Perspectives article (1500–4000 words). For guidance on how to submit, please see www.tandfonline.com/rasw and the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th Edition.

Deadline for submission

All manuscripts should be submitted via Scholar One Manuscripts: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/rasw, no later than 30 May 2019. Authors are encouraged to contact the Guest Editors to discuss their intended submissions.

(Australian Social Worker, ©2018)

The 5th International Conference on Youth Mental Health: United for Global Change

Brisbane, 26-29 October 2019: Call for abstracts

Open until 14/12/2018 for poster, oral, tabletop or lightening presentation.

    Annotated bibilography: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy

    Annotated bibliography

    Curran, G. M., Woo, S. M., Hepner, K. A., Lai, W. P., Kramer, T. L., Drummond, K. L., & Weingardt, K. (2015). Training Substance Use Disorder Counselors in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression: Development and Initial Exploration of an Online Training Program. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 58(1), 33-42.
    The authors of this paper state that evidence-based psychotherapies (EBP) are underutilised and that to combat this models for training in EBP are necessary. These need to be cost-effective, minimally disruptive and flexible, which led them to consider internet technology as a potential platform for delivery. They developed an online training package for the Building Recovery by Improving Goals, Habits and Thoughts (BRIGHT) program, which is based on cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT). This was a sixteen session group depression treatment for people with substance use disorders (SUD). They explored the possibility of delivering the BRIGHT training to counsellors online rather than in a face-to-face program. Eight volunteer counsellors across seven Veterans’ Affairs SUD programs completed the training. A lack of protected time for the counsellors to do the training was the largest barrier. Many had to do it in their own time or in breaks between clients and found it frustrating and fragmented. Those who completed the training found it a positive and useful experience. A limitation in this study is the small and specific sample size.

    Delgadillo, J., Gore, S., Ali, S., Ekers, D., Gilbody, S., Gilchrist, G., & … Hughes, E. (2015). Feasibility Randomized Controlled Trial of Cognitive and Behavioral Interventions for Depression Symptoms in Patients Accessing Drug and Alcohol Treatment. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 55(1), 6-14.

    Depression and frequent alcohol and drug use often co-exist prompting this study, which conducted a trial to examine the practicality of screening, recruitment, randomisation and engagement of drug and alcohol users for psychological interventions to treat depressive symptoms The participants (n=50) were all involved in community drugs and alcohol treatment (CDAT). They were then randomly assigned to behavioural intervention delivered by psychologists (n=23) or CBT based self-help introduced by CDAT workers (n=27). Recruitment and retention rates, along with changes in depressive symptoms and changes in days abstinent were measured at the 24 week follow up. The fifty participants were recruited from a pool of approximately 200 individuals and the randomisation produced comparable groups. Seventy-eight percent of the participants were present at the 24 week follow up point. The engagement rate for the participants who received psychological interventions was low with only 42% attending at least one session and there was no significant difference in engagement between the two groups. However, those from both groups who engaged with treatment did have moderate improvements in depressive symptoms. Co-existence of alcohol and drug services and mental health services does appear to improve engagement with treatment. A limitation was the high attrition rate, which was more likely in those with polysubstance use.

    Epstein, E. E., McCrady, B. S., Hallgren, K. A., Gaba, A., Cook, S., Jensen, N., & … Litt, M. D. (2018). Individual versus group female-specific cognitive behavior therapy for alcohol use disorder. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 88(1), 27-43.

    This study aimed to test group-based female-specific CBT (G-FS-CBT) for women with alcohol use disorder (AUD) against an individual female-specific CBT (I-FS-CBT). The authors wanted to describe the development of G-FS-CBT. They also aimed to examine its content, feasibility, acceptability, group process, participant engagement and treatment outcomes. The study was a randomised controlled trial in which 155 women with AUD were randomly assigned to twelve manual guided sessions of G-FS-CBT or I-FS-CBT. Of the participants, 138 women attended at least one session. Women who were assigned into the G-FS-CBT group attended less sessions than those assigned the I-FS-CBT group. Engagement rate was rated as high in both groups by independent assessors and women in both groups reported high satisfaction with their treatment. During the first six weeks of treatment, participants in both groups significantly reduced their percent drinking days and percent heavy drinking days by equivalent amounts, which they maintained during treatment and at the twelve month follow up. They all also reported significant improvement in treatment outcomes including depression, self-efficacy, anxiety and abstinence. They concluded that the study offered support for G-FS-CBT as a treatment for women with AUD, offering single gender community support, programmed specifically for women. A limitation in the study was the limited demographics in the group being studied, although it was felt that as the program was a tailored one, it could be adapted for different age groups and different socio-economic groups.

    Haller, M., Norman, S. B., Cummins, K., Trim, R. S., Xu, X., Cui, R., & … Tate, S. R. (2016). Integrated Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Versus Cognitive Processing Therapy for Adults With Depression, Substance Use Disorder, and Trauma. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 62(1), 38-48.

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression and SUD are often comorbid conditions suffered by veterans. Research has previously indicated that veterans who had comorbidity of these three conditions did not maintain treatment gains from CBT as well as those with depression and SUD but not PTSD. The aim of this study was to investigate if adding trauma-focused treatment after an initial group-based integrated CBT for SUD and depression resulted in improved treatment outcomes. They recruited 123 veterans (89% male) from a single healthcare system to participate in the study. They all received integrated CBT sessions twice a week for 12 weeks (Phase 1). They were then randomly allocated to receive 12 individual follow-up sessions (Phase 2) using either integrated CBT or cognitive processing therapy modified to include SUD treatment (CPT-M). PTSD and depressive symptoms improved slightly at the end of Phase 1 and improved further during Phase 2, except for those without PTSD who received CPT-M. These improvements were maintained one year later. Substance use significantly improved by the end of Phase 1 and was maintained throughout Phase 2 and at one year follow-up. Similar levels of symptom improvement were seen in participants in the trauma-focused Phase 2 treatment (CPT-M) as those in the non-trauma focused treatment (integrated CBT), but there was a slight advantage of CPT-M over integrated CBT in heavy drinking outcomes for participants with PTSD. They concluded that generally group integrated CBT followed by either individual integrated CBT or CPT-M seemed to be effective for veterans with depression, SUD and PTSD. An important limitation of the study was that the participants were mainly male and that the results may not apply to female veterans.

    Kiluk, B. D., DeVito, E. E., Buck, M. B., Hunkele, K., Nich, C., & Carroll, K. M. (2017). Effect of computerized cognitive behavioral therapy on acquisition of coping skills among cocaine-dependent individuals enrolled in methadone maintenance. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 82(1), 87-92.

    The development of coping skills has generally been considered to be a result of CBT for SUD but there is little statistical evidence to support this. The aim of this study was to reproduce and expand previous research on the quality of coping skills as a predictor of abstinence in substance users who had participated in a computerised CBT program. The participants were cocaine-dependent individuals enrolled in a methadone maintenance program. They were randomly assigned to treatment as usual (TAU) (n=54) or computerised CBT and TAU (n=47), which consisted of seven modules accessed on a special computer in a private room. They were interviewed by a research assistant at the beginning and end of treatment, twice weekly during treatments and 1, 3 and 6 months after treatment. Coping skills were measured using the Drug Risk Response Test (DRRT). At the 6 month post treatment point, 89 participants remained. They were unable to replicate the results of the previous studies, which may have been due to differences in the study participants. Their analysis did not support the acquisition of coping skills as a predictor of treatment outcome. However those assigned to computerised CBT and TAU, showed greater improvement in coping skills than those assigned to TAU only. A limitation in the study was the small sample size.

    Morris, L., Stander, J., Ebrahim, W., Eksteen, S., Meaden, O., Ras, A., & Wessels, A. (2018). Effect of exercise versus cognitive behavioural therapy or no intervention on anxiety, depression, fitness and quality of life in adults with previous methamphetamine dependency: a systematic review. Addiction Science & Clinical Practice, 13(1), 1-12.

    Methamphetamine is a psychostimulant used by approximately 52 million people globally and is extremely addictive. When used chronically it can cause adverse psychological, physical and neurological changes, including increases in depression and anxiety and decreases in fitness and quality of life. It has been suggested that exercise has the possibility of reversing these changes. This systematic review aimed to examine the available evidence on the effectiveness of exercise as opposed to CBT, standard care or no intervention on reducing anxiety and depression and improving fitness and quality of life in previous users of methamphetamine. The initial search identified 251 articles, which was first reduced to 14 potentially relevant studies, whose abstracts were reviewed. The final selection was three articles comprising two randomised control trials and one quasi-experimental pilot. The review concluded that depression and anxiety scores were significantly reduced with exercise as opposed to CBT. There were also significant improvements in quality of life scores in those exercising. It recommended that exercise be included in therapy for methamphetamine use. A limitation in this study was the small number of studies reviewed.

    Zhang Z, Zhang L, Zhang G, Jin J, Zheng Z. The effect of CBT and its modifications for relapse prevention in major depressive disorder: a systematic review and meta-analysis. BMC Psychiatry [serial online]. December 1, 2018; 18(1):1-14. Available from: E-Journals, Ipswich, MA. Accessed March 25, 2018

    CBT and its variations could be effective in preventing relapse in individuals with major depressive disorder (MDD). This review therefore aimed to evaluate the efficacy of CBT in preventing relapse in MDD. The researchers searched several databases to find relevant studies. They found sixteen studies investigating a total of 1945 participants, which met the criteria of the review. CBT was found to be more efficacious than control in reducing relapse in MDD individuals who were in remission. In those with three or more previous depressive episodes, mindfulness-based cognitive (MBCT) was more effective than control in reducing relapse. They concluded that using CBT in individuals with MDD may decrease the risk of relapse and that MBCT may only work for those MDD individuals with three or more previous episodes. The limitations in the study include the trial sizes in some of the studies evaluated and that the research was limited to MDD, rather than all depressive disorders.

    Open Access articles can be accessed by clicking on the titles, others are available from our library datatbase for Healthy Options Australia staff and volunteers.

    March PD

    Professional development

    You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

    Online resources

    Webpage

    National Rural Health Alliance:  This site provides access to resources such as factsheets to support rural health

    Read – professional reading

    Available from the library database

    Hyder, S., Coomber, K., Pennay, A., Droste, N., Curtis, A., Mayshak, R., & … Miller, P. G. (2018). Correlates of verbal and physical aggression among patrons of licensed venues in Australia. Drug And Alcohol Review, 37(1), 6-13.

    Skerrett, D. M., Gibson, M., Darwin, L., Lewis, S., Rallah, R., & De Leo, D. (2018). Closing the Gap in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Youth Suicide: A Social–Emotional Wellbeing Service Innovation Project. Australian Psychologist, 53(1), 13-22.

    Tomyn, A. J., & Weinberg, M. K. (2018). Resilience and Subjective Wellbeing: A Psychometric Evaluation in Young Australian Adults. Australian Psychologist, 53(1), 68-76.

    Vo, H. T., Burgower, R., Rozenberg, I., & Fishman, M. (2018). Home-based delivery of XR-NTX in youth with opioid addiction. Journal Of Substance Abuse Treatment, 85(1), 84-89.

    Yuke, K., Ford, P., Foley, W., Mutch, A., Fitzgerald, L., & Gartner, C. (2018). Australian urban Indigenous smokers’ perspectives on nicotine products and tobacco harm reduction. Drug And Alcohol Review, 37(1), 87-96.

    Open Access Articles

    Open access online journal

    World Psychiatry: the official journal of the World Psychiatric Association

    Open access textbook

    Pradhan, B., Pinninti, N., & Rathod, S. (2015). Brief Interventions for Psychosis.

    This book offers a clinical guide that brings together a broad range of brief interventions and their applications in treating psychosis. It describes two core approaches that can narrow the current, substantial gap between the need for psychotherapeutic interventions for all individuals suffering from psychosis, and the limited mental health resources available.The first approach involves utilizing the standard therapeutic modalities in the context of routine clinical interactions after adapting them into brief and effective formats. To that end, the book brings in experts on various psychotherapeutic modalities, who discuss how their particular modality could be adapted to more effectively fit into the existing system of care delivery.The second approach, addressed in detail, is to extend the availability of these brief interventions by utilizing the circle of providers as well as the social circle of the clients so that these interventions can be provided in a coordinated and complementary manner by psychiatrists, psychologists, clinical social workers, case managers, peer support specialists and other providers on the one hand, and by family members, friends, social and religious institutions on the other.

    (Book Abstract)

    e-Book of the month

    Fall, K. A., & Howard, S. (2017). Alternatives to Domestic Violence : A Homework Manual for Battering Intervention Groups. New York, NY: Routledge.

    This is an interactive treatment workbook designed for use with a wide variety of accepted curricula for domestic violence intervention programs. This new edition adds and revises the exercises and stories in every chapter, covering important topics such as respect and accountability, maintaining positive relationships, good communication, parenting, substance abuse, digital abuse, and sexuality. Chapters on parenting, substance abuse, and religion have also been heavily revised based on current literature and group member feedback. The chapters provide a comprehensive collection of vital topics, including topics rarely addressed in other curricula, and exercises help the group members learn new strategies for leading a life of cooperation and shared power. Continuing the tradition of past editions, this edition not only focuses on the content of a good BIPP curriculum, but it also stresses the group process elements that form the backbone of any quality approach.

    (copied from EBSCO database)

    Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

    Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

    Insight Queensland

    Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

    March 1-2: Cullturally secure AOD practice- featruring IRIS

    March 2: Understanding psychoactive drugs (Townsville)

    March 13: AOD crash course

    March 15: Understanding psychoactive drugs

    March 15: The problem gambling severity index (PGSI)

    March 23: AOD clinical assessment

    March 26: Young people and drugs

    March 29: Harm reduction 101

    More details and registration here

    Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

    Turning Point seminars are online on their YouTube channel including:

    Pathways out of addiction: the role of social groups and identity

    Youth, moral panics and chemical cultures: a series of 4 short videos

    Journal club TBA and will be on SKYPE

    Attend – conferences 

    QCOSS State Conference, May 16-17 at Brisbane: Movement for change. Cost $330-792 before March 16. Register here

    • Explore the current landscape in which we live and work, uncover the big issues and identify the stories that are dividing our community.
    • Develop an understanding of the evidence base for change and the current state of play from which we can move forward.
    • Explore reforms currently underway. Challenge your beliefs and attitudes and understand how these shape our actions and influence reform directions.
    • Hear from communities who have taken action, told a different story and have had success. How did they do it? What have they learned? Is this something we can all affect?
    • Learn from opinion leaders from different backgrounds and sectors who will discuss their experiences and how we can change how we think and tell our stories for the betterment of everyone.
    • Leave with an appetite and a recipe for action to take us closer to our desired future.

    (QCOSS)

    Listen – podcasts, webinars

    Insight Qld

    Free webinars on Wednesdays 10:00-11:00 (AEST).

    • March 7: AOD ‘our way’
    • March 14: Alcohol meets dementia- sorting through the maze
    • March 21: Codeine rescheduling: All you need to know but were too afraid to ask!
    • March 28: Treatment within corrections

    Access at www.insight.qld.edu.au and enter participant code: 52365378

    More details here

    Australian and Indigenous Alcohol and Other Drugs Knowledge Centre have a selection of webinars including:

    Harnessing good intentions: addressing harmful AOD use among Aboriginal Australians

    A practical guide to community-based approaches for reducing alcohol harm

    Assessed learning – short courses, certificates, diplomas, bachelors, post-grad

    The art of CBT: Skillfully appying the manuals to common clinical problems: One day workshop:

    Adelaide 18 May; Brisbane 1 June: see link for other major cities. Costs $110-455 depending on status. Register here

    4 Day Intensive CBT Masterclass for AOD Professionals

    Where: Melbourne,  17-20 April 2018, $990-1390

    This course has been developed especially for alcohol and other drug professionals who want to build and strengthen the core CBT clinical skills that are the foundation for all best practice CBT protocols from traditional CBT to newer cognitive therapy models like the mindfulness-based therapies.

    • Get back to basics and understand exactly what makes CBT tick
    • Learn the why not just the how so you can apply core skills to any CBT type
    • Unlock the art and science of your practice to take it to the next level

    Our unique interactive self-practice approach means you will really experience CBT from the inside, creating a deep understanding of how it works. Cognitive behaviour therapy is an umbrella term that includes a number of solution oriented therapies focusing on self-reflection, problem solving and learning skills that can be applied across situations:

    • Cognitive Therapy
    • Relapse Prevention
    • Mindfulness Based Cognitive Therapy
    • Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
    • Dialectical Behaviour Therapy
    • Compassion Focused Therapy

    Find out how to use the core skills of CBT to drive change whatever model you use. Our focus is understanding and experiencing the drivers of change in CBT that underlie all CBT models. Book here

     

     

     

     www.insight.qld.edu.auwww.insight.qld.edu.au