November PD Blog

Professional development

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

The Lowitja Institute is Australia’s national institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research.

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Glassner, S. D., & Cho, S. (2018). Bullying victimization, negative emotions, and substance use: utilizing general strain theory to examine the undesirable outcomes of childhood bullying victimization in adolescence and young adulthood. Journal of Youth Studies, 1-18.

Kelly, P. J., Robinson, L. D., Baker, A. L., Deane, F. P., Osborne, B., Hudson, S., & Hides, L. (2018). Quality of life of individuals seeking treatment at specialist non-government alcohol and other drug treatment services: A latent class analysis. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 94, 47-54.

Mullins, C., & Khawaja, N. G. (2018). Non‐Indigenous Psychologists Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People: Towards Clinical and Cultural Competence. Australian Psychologist, 53(5), 394-404.

Raubenheimer, J. E., & Barratt, M. J. (2018). Digital era drug surveillance: Quo vadis, Australia?. Drug and alcohol review, 37(6), 693-696.

Shono, Y., Ames, S. L., Edwards, M. C., & Stacy, A. W. (2018). The Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index for Adolescent Alcohol and Drug Problems: A Comprehensive Modern Psychometric Study. Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, 79(4), 658-663.

Silins, E., John Horwood, L., Najman, J. M., Patton, G. C., Toumbourou, J. W., Olsson, C. A., … & Boden, J. M. (2018). Adverse adult consequences of different alcohol use patterns in adolescence: An integrative analysis of data to age 30 years from four Australasian cohorts. Addiction113 (10), 1811-1825 

Open Access Articles

Gray D, Cartwright K, Stearne A, Saggers S, Wilkes E, Wilson M (2018) Review of the harmful use of alcohol among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet.

Han, X., He, Y., Bi, G.H., et al. CB1 receptor activation on VgluT2-expressing glutamatergic neurons underlies Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC)-induced aversive effects in mice. Sci Rep 7(1):12315, 2017.

Kiluk, B.D., Nich, C., Buck, M.B., et al. Randomized clinical trial of computerized and clinician-delivered CBT in comparison with standard outpatient treatment for substance use disorders: Primary within-treatment and follow-up outcomes. Am J Psychiatry, 2018 May 24:appiajp201817090978. doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.17090978. [Epub ahead of print]

Weinberger, A.H., Platt, J., Esan, H., et al. Cigarette smoking is associated with increased risk of substance use disorder relapse: A nationally representative, prospective longitudinal investigation. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 78(2):e152-e160, 2017.

Open access online journal

Addictive behaviors is an international peer-reviewed journal publishing high quality human research on addictive behaviors and disorders since 1975.

e-Book of the month

Mignon, S. I. (2015). Substance Abuse Treatment : Options, Challenges, and Effectiveness. New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company.

The first compendium of all substance abuse treatment options with a focus on best practices. This is the first compendium of the entire range of options available for treating substance abuse, with a focus on effectiveness. The book synthesizes treatment approaches from medicine, psychology, sociology, and social work, and investigates regimens that range from brief interventions to the most intensive and expensive types of inpatient treatment programs. It examines controversies over best practices in substance treatment and closely analyzes current research findings and their applicability for improving substance abuse treatment in the future. Written for both academics and clinicians, the book translates complex research findings into an easily understandable format. Substance Abuse Treatment examines the circumstances under which a treatment is considered effective and how effectiveness is measured. It discusses treatment goals and looks at the importance of client motivation in positive treatment outcomes. A great variety of inpatient and outpatient treatment options are examined, as are self-help programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous. This segues to a discussion of the changing role of self-help programs in treatment. The text also analyzes changes in the substance abuse treatment industry that make treatment more costly and less available to those without financial resources. It gives special attention to the treatment of diverse populations, those with co-occurring disorders, and criminal justice populations. National, state, and local prevention efforts are covered as well as substance abuse prevention and future issues in treatment. The book is intended for undergraduate and graduate substance abuse courses in all relevant areas of study. In addition, it will be an important reference for substance abuse clinicians and other health professionals who treat patients with substance abuse issues.Key Features:Comprises a comprehensive, up-to-date, and practical guide to the field of substance abuse treatment and its efficacy Synthesizes treatment approaches from medicine, psychology, sociology, and social work Investigates all regimens ranging from brief interventions to intensive inpatient treatment programs, from outpatient to 12-step programs Explores the changing role of self-help programs in treatment Includes chapters on substance abuse treatment with special populations including children/adolescents, women, older adults, and criminal offenders (from EBSCO site).

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Useful resources

Opioid Check is a package of free tools, e-learning, videos and other resources designed for Queensland-based health and community service workers who engage with people who use opioids. Insight also have a range of other toolkits available to use including Meth Check, First Nations AOD and Dual Diagnosis.

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Introduction to motivational interviewing (Prerequisite online induction material, module 5): Brisbane, 01/11/2018; Bundaberg, 07/11/2018; Cairns, 23/11/2018

AOD relapse prevention and management (Prerequisite online induction material, module 6):  Townsville, 02/11/2018, Bundaberg, 08/11/2018; Gold Coast, 22/11/2018; Cairns, 30/11/2018

The problem gambling severity index (PGSI): a screen for problem gambling in AOD and mental health populations: Brisbane, 08/11/2018

Understanding psychoactive drugs (Prerequisite online induction material, module 2) : Cairns, 09/11/2018

AOD crash course: introduction to working with people who use substances: Cairns, 13/11/2018; Townsville, 27/11/2018

Sensory approaches for AOD practice: Brisbane, 13/11/2018

Introduction to withdrawal management: Bundaberg, 14/11/2018

An introduction to mindfulness in AOD (2 days): Brisbane, 15/11/2018

Advanced harm reduction (Participants must have completed Insight’s “Understanding Psychoactive Drugs” workshop or be an existing employee of an AOD or Mental Health service to be eligible for this workshop): Bundaberg, 15/11/2018

AOD clinical assessment (Prerequisite online induction material, module 4): Cairns, 16/11/2018

Micro-counselling skills and brief interventions: Brisbane, 20/11/2018

NIDA

Assessment and Treatment of Adolescent Marijuana Abuse and Dependence is a self-paced online course presented jointly by NIDA Notes and IRETA.

The activities should take about one hour to complete.

As you navigate the course, you’ll learn to identify the relationship between adolescents and sensation seeking/impulsivity. This connection is associated with the escalation of substance use. Students will become familiar with the screening tools that can detect and assess teens’ marijuana use, then explore new approaches to interventions and aftercare.

Listen – podcasts, webinars

The Drug Classroom is an interview style podcast that provides in depth discussions on a range of topics relating alcohol and other drugs including pharmacology, pharmacotherapy, drug policy and user experiences. The people interviewed in the podcast range from journalists, activists, psychotherapists, researchers and family members. Some of the topics covered include harm reduction for MDMA, opioid risks and problematic prescribing.

Dovetail is producing a series of short videos describing how workers can match their AOD interventions to a young person’s readiness to make a change.  The first video explains the Stages of Change model. In the early 1980s, researchers Prochaska and DiClemente developed the Transtheoretical model or ‘stages of change’ as it is better known. The stages of change model is a useful guide for understanding and exploring the process of change and can be used to tailor and match interventions that are person-centred and meaningful.

 

Non-suicidal self-injury

 

Webinars

NHMRC

27/11/2018 at 15:30 (AEST): Prevention and early intervention of mental illness and substance use: Building the architecture for change. Presented by Prof. Maree Teesson.

Insight

Wednesdays, 10:00-11:00 (AEST)

07/11/2018: Steroids: what are the risks and how do we reduce them?

14/11/2018: Managing pain in opioid dependent patients

21/11/2018: Portugal and beyond – alternatives to the war on drugs

Insight presentation recordings available now on YouTube

Write

Australian Social Work

The theme of this Special Issue of Australian Social Work is strategies for working with involuntary and resistant clients. Social workers work with involuntary clients and those who are resistant to decisions made on their behalf, in a wide range of fields in policy and practice including: child welfare; corrections; family services; health and mental health; substance use or abuse, or both; domestic violence; aged care; and school welfare.

The Guest Editors for this Special Issue are: Professor Chris Trotter, Social Work Department, Monash University (); Professor Emeritus Ronald Rooney, Social Work Department, University of Minnesota (); and Professor Traci LaLiberte, Social Work Department, University of Minnesota, (), all of whom are well-known for their work with involuntary clients.

In May 2018, a conference on this theme was held at the Monash Centre in Prato, Italy. While delegates who presented papers at this conference have been invited to submit papers, this is an open invitation. All those interested in the themes of the Special Issue are encouraged to submit papers.

Relevant papers would address: work with involuntary clients in the range of fields referred to above; strategies for working with the involuntary, mandated, non-voluntary or resistant clients in a variety of settings; the dynamics of working with this population; the importance of building relationships; problem solving with involuntary clients; challenging involuntary clients; practice skills specific to these groups.

Guidelines for submission

Authors may submit an original article (4000–6000 words), or a Practice, Policy, and Perspectives article (1500–4000 words). For guidance on how to submit, please see www.tandfonline.com/rasw and the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th Edition.

Deadline for submission

All manuscripts should be submitted via Scholar One Manuscripts: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/rasw, no later than 30 May 2019. Authors are encouraged to contact the Guest Editors to discuss their intended submissions.

(Australian Social Worker, ©2018)

The 5th International Conference on Youth Mental Health: United for Global Change

Brisbane, 26-29 October 2019: Call for abstracts

Open until 14/12/2018 for poster, oral, tabletop or lightening presentation.

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