December PD Blog

Professional development

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Cook, J. A. (2018). Gendered expectations of the biographical and social future: young adults’ approaches to short and long-term thinking. Journal of Youth Studies, 21(10), 1376-1391.

Kikkert, M., Goudriaan, A., de Waal, M., Peen, J., & Dekker, J. (2018). Effectiveness of Integrated Dual Diagnosis Treatment (IDDT) in severe mental illness outpatients with a co-occurring substance use disorder. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 95(1), 35–42.

Rogers, J. L., Bernard, J. M., Veach, L. J., Moro, R. R., Ivers, N. N., Reboussin, B. A., … & O’Brien, M. C. (2018). Brief Counseling for Alcohol Misuse Among Trauma Patients: Two Interventions and Influence of Baseline Use. Journal of Addictions & Offender Counseling, 39(2), 89-105.

Shono, Y., Ames, S. L., Edwards, M. C., & Stacy, A. W. (2018). The Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index for Adolescent Alcohol and Drug Problems: A Comprehensive Modern Psychometric Study. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 79(4), 658-663.

Stockings, E., Bartlem, K., Hall, A., Hodder, R., Gilligan, C., Wiggers, J., … & Wolfenden, L. (2018). Whole‐of‐community interventions to reduce population‐level harms arising from alcohol and other drug use: a systematic review and meta‐analysis. Addiction. 113 (11), 1984-2018

Welch, T., & Cleak, H. (2018). Is Housing a Predictor of Autonomy and Quality of Life of People with Severe Mental Illness? Implications for Social Work. Australian Social Work, 71(4), 491-506.

Open Access Articles

Armstrong, G., Ironfield, N., Kelly, C. M., Dart, K., Arabena, K., Bond, K., … & Jorm, A. F. (2018). Re-development of mental health first aid guidelines for supporting Aboriginal and Torres Strait islanders who are experiencing suicidal thoughts and behaviour. BMC psychiatry, 18(1), 228.

Fricker, N., Banbury, S., & Visick, A. (2018). Female domestic violence counsellors/psychotherapists: attitudes towards addiction: An IPA. MOJ Addict Med Ther, 5(3), 139-143.

Kamerāde, D., & Bennett, M. R. (2018). Rewarding work: cross-national differences in benefits, volunteering during unemployment, well-being and mental health. Work, Employment and Society, 32(1), 38-56.

Mahedy, L., MacArthur, G. J., Hammerton, G., Edwards, A. C., Kendler, K. S., Macleod, J., … & Heron, J. (2018). The effect of parental drinking on alcohol use in young adults: the mediating role of parental monitoring and peer deviance. Addiction.113 (11). 2041-2050 

Useful resources

Yarning Straight Out: New AOD online resource for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Clients

The Man Box: a study about being a young man in Australia

Insight Family AOD Toolkit contains tools and resources for those working with families

The Library’s Pinterest account contains AOD and mental health resources  for workers, clients and significant others.

The Black Dog Institute has links to online self-help tools and apps for those suffering from mental illness

e-Book of the month

Tolin, D. F., Steketee, G., & Frost, R. O. (2014). Buried in Treasures : Help for Compulsive Acquiring, Saving, and Hoarding (Vol. Second edition). Oxford: Oxford University Press

While most people find it relatively easy to manage their possessions, some find it extremely difficult. If you have a problem resisting the urge to acquire and you find your home cluttered and filled to capacity with items many people would find useless and unnecessary, you may suffer from a condition known as hoarding disorder. Hoarding is a behavioural problem consisting of clutter, difficulty discarding items, and excessive buying or acquiring. Hoarding is often associated with significant reduction in quality of life, and in extreme cases, it can pose serious health risks. If you or a loved one has hoarding disorder, this book can help. This fully updated Second Edition of Buried in Treasures outlines a scientifically based, effective program for helping those with hoarding disorder dig their way out of the clutter and chaos of their homes. Written by scientists and practitioners who are leaders in studying and treating hoarding disorder, this book outlines a program of skill-building, learning to think about possessions in a different way, and gradual challenges to help people manage their clutter and their lives. It also provides useful information for family and friends of people who hoard, as they struggle to understand and help. Discover the reasons for your problems with acquiring, saving, and hoarding, and learn new ways of thinking about your possessions so you can decide what you really need and what you can do without. Learn to identify the ‘bad guys’ that cause and maintain your hoarding behaviour and meet the ‘good guys’ who can help motivate you and put you on the path to change. Useful self-assessments will help you determine the severity of your problem. Training exercises, case examples, organizing tips, and motivation boosters help change the way you think and behave toward your possessions. This book provides easy-to-understand strategies and techniques that anyone can use.

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Listen – podcasts, webinars

 

Insight presentation recordings available now on YouTube

Other learning – short courses, certificates, diplomas, bachelors, post-grad

Introduction to Narrative Practice

6-7 December, cost $420

This 2 day workshop will offer an accessible introduction to key ideas and practices that inform narrative practice. Underpinning values, beliefs and assumptions of the approach will be explored. The workshop will introduce people to the concept of how stories can shape our lives. Narrative practice ideas will come alive with a range of practice stories and live demonstrations. Participants will have a chance to experiment and play with how to define an issue or a problem in a way that separates the person from the problem.

The workshop will be an opportunity to step away from the busyness of our work, to reflect on how we can work with our clients in ways that enable them re-connect with what is important to them, to assist them to step closer to their preferred ways of living (despite the problems they might be facing in their lives).

Workshop Venue: Lighthouse Resources Upstairs Training Room, Kyabra Street RUNCORN, QLD. 4113

 

November PD Blog

Professional development

You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

Online resources

Webpage

The Lowitja Institute is Australia’s national institute for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research.

Read – professional reading

Available from the library database

Glassner, S. D., & Cho, S. (2018). Bullying victimization, negative emotions, and substance use: utilizing general strain theory to examine the undesirable outcomes of childhood bullying victimization in adolescence and young adulthood. Journal of Youth Studies, 1-18.

Kelly, P. J., Robinson, L. D., Baker, A. L., Deane, F. P., Osborne, B., Hudson, S., & Hides, L. (2018). Quality of life of individuals seeking treatment at specialist non-government alcohol and other drug treatment services: A latent class analysis. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 94, 47-54.

Mullins, C., & Khawaja, N. G. (2018). Non‐Indigenous Psychologists Working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People: Towards Clinical and Cultural Competence. Australian Psychologist, 53(5), 394-404.

Raubenheimer, J. E., & Barratt, M. J. (2018). Digital era drug surveillance: Quo vadis, Australia?. Drug and alcohol review, 37(6), 693-696.

Shono, Y., Ames, S. L., Edwards, M. C., & Stacy, A. W. (2018). The Rutgers Alcohol Problem Index for Adolescent Alcohol and Drug Problems: A Comprehensive Modern Psychometric Study. Journal of studies on alcohol and drugs, 79(4), 658-663.

Silins, E., John Horwood, L., Najman, J. M., Patton, G. C., Toumbourou, J. W., Olsson, C. A., … & Boden, J. M. (2018). Adverse adult consequences of different alcohol use patterns in adolescence: An integrative analysis of data to age 30 years from four Australasian cohorts. Addiction113 (10), 1811-1825 

Open Access Articles

Gray D, Cartwright K, Stearne A, Saggers S, Wilkes E, Wilson M (2018) Review of the harmful use of alcohol among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. Australian Indigenous HealthInfoNet.

Han, X., He, Y., Bi, G.H., et al. CB1 receptor activation on VgluT2-expressing glutamatergic neurons underlies Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC)-induced aversive effects in mice. Sci Rep 7(1):12315, 2017.

Kiluk, B.D., Nich, C., Buck, M.B., et al. Randomized clinical trial of computerized and clinician-delivered CBT in comparison with standard outpatient treatment for substance use disorders: Primary within-treatment and follow-up outcomes. Am J Psychiatry, 2018 May 24:appiajp201817090978. doi: 10.1176/appi.ajp.2018.17090978. [Epub ahead of print]

Weinberger, A.H., Platt, J., Esan, H., et al. Cigarette smoking is associated with increased risk of substance use disorder relapse: A nationally representative, prospective longitudinal investigation. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 78(2):e152-e160, 2017.

Open access online journal

Addictive behaviors is an international peer-reviewed journal publishing high quality human research on addictive behaviors and disorders since 1975.

e-Book of the month

Mignon, S. I. (2015). Substance Abuse Treatment : Options, Challenges, and Effectiveness. New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company.

The first compendium of all substance abuse treatment options with a focus on best practices. This is the first compendium of the entire range of options available for treating substance abuse, with a focus on effectiveness. The book synthesizes treatment approaches from medicine, psychology, sociology, and social work, and investigates regimens that range from brief interventions to the most intensive and expensive types of inpatient treatment programs. It examines controversies over best practices in substance treatment and closely analyzes current research findings and their applicability for improving substance abuse treatment in the future. Written for both academics and clinicians, the book translates complex research findings into an easily understandable format. Substance Abuse Treatment examines the circumstances under which a treatment is considered effective and how effectiveness is measured. It discusses treatment goals and looks at the importance of client motivation in positive treatment outcomes. A great variety of inpatient and outpatient treatment options are examined, as are self-help programs such as Alcoholics Anonymous. This segues to a discussion of the changing role of self-help programs in treatment. The text also analyzes changes in the substance abuse treatment industry that make treatment more costly and less available to those without financial resources. It gives special attention to the treatment of diverse populations, those with co-occurring disorders, and criminal justice populations. National, state, and local prevention efforts are covered as well as substance abuse prevention and future issues in treatment. The book is intended for undergraduate and graduate substance abuse courses in all relevant areas of study. In addition, it will be an important reference for substance abuse clinicians and other health professionals who treat patients with substance abuse issues.Key Features:Comprises a comprehensive, up-to-date, and practical guide to the field of substance abuse treatment and its efficacy Synthesizes treatment approaches from medicine, psychology, sociology, and social work Investigates all regimens ranging from brief interventions to intensive inpatient treatment programs, from outpatient to 12-step programs Explores the changing role of self-help programs in treatment Includes chapters on substance abuse treatment with special populations including children/adolescents, women, older adults, and criminal offenders (from EBSCO site).

Free to download for all HOA staff from the library catalogue on work computers

Useful resources

Opioid Check is a package of free tools, e-learning, videos and other resources designed for Queensland-based health and community service workers who engage with people who use opioids. Insight also have a range of other toolkits available to use including Meth Check, First Nations AOD and Dual Diagnosis.

Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

Insight Queensland

Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

Introduction to motivational interviewing (Prerequisite online induction material, module 5): Brisbane, 01/11/2018; Bundaberg, 07/11/2018; Cairns, 23/11/2018

AOD relapse prevention and management (Prerequisite online induction material, module 6):  Townsville, 02/11/2018, Bundaberg, 08/11/2018; Gold Coast, 22/11/2018; Cairns, 30/11/2018

The problem gambling severity index (PGSI): a screen for problem gambling in AOD and mental health populations: Brisbane, 08/11/2018

Understanding psychoactive drugs (Prerequisite online induction material, module 2) : Cairns, 09/11/2018

AOD crash course: introduction to working with people who use substances: Cairns, 13/11/2018; Townsville, 27/11/2018

Sensory approaches for AOD practice: Brisbane, 13/11/2018

Introduction to withdrawal management: Bundaberg, 14/11/2018

An introduction to mindfulness in AOD (2 days): Brisbane, 15/11/2018

Advanced harm reduction (Participants must have completed Insight’s “Understanding Psychoactive Drugs” workshop or be an existing employee of an AOD or Mental Health service to be eligible for this workshop): Bundaberg, 15/11/2018

AOD clinical assessment (Prerequisite online induction material, module 4): Cairns, 16/11/2018

Micro-counselling skills and brief interventions: Brisbane, 20/11/2018

NIDA

Assessment and Treatment of Adolescent Marijuana Abuse and Dependence is a self-paced online course presented jointly by NIDA Notes and IRETA.

The activities should take about one hour to complete.

As you navigate the course, you’ll learn to identify the relationship between adolescents and sensation seeking/impulsivity. This connection is associated with the escalation of substance use. Students will become familiar with the screening tools that can detect and assess teens’ marijuana use, then explore new approaches to interventions and aftercare.

Listen – podcasts, webinars

The Drug Classroom is an interview style podcast that provides in depth discussions on a range of topics relating alcohol and other drugs including pharmacology, pharmacotherapy, drug policy and user experiences. The people interviewed in the podcast range from journalists, activists, psychotherapists, researchers and family members. Some of the topics covered include harm reduction for MDMA, opioid risks and problematic prescribing.

Dovetail is producing a series of short videos describing how workers can match their AOD interventions to a young person’s readiness to make a change.  The first video explains the Stages of Change model. In the early 1980s, researchers Prochaska and DiClemente developed the Transtheoretical model or ‘stages of change’ as it is better known. The stages of change model is a useful guide for understanding and exploring the process of change and can be used to tailor and match interventions that are person-centred and meaningful.

 

Non-suicidal self-injury

 

Webinars

NHMRC

27/11/2018 at 15:30 (AEST): Prevention and early intervention of mental illness and substance use: Building the architecture for change. Presented by Prof. Maree Teesson.

Insight

Wednesdays, 10:00-11:00 (AEST)

07/11/2018: Steroids: what are the risks and how do we reduce them?

14/11/2018: Managing pain in opioid dependent patients

21/11/2018: Portugal and beyond – alternatives to the war on drugs

Insight presentation recordings available now on YouTube

Write

Australian Social Work

The theme of this Special Issue of Australian Social Work is strategies for working with involuntary and resistant clients. Social workers work with involuntary clients and those who are resistant to decisions made on their behalf, in a wide range of fields in policy and practice including: child welfare; corrections; family services; health and mental health; substance use or abuse, or both; domestic violence; aged care; and school welfare.

The Guest Editors for this Special Issue are: Professor Chris Trotter, Social Work Department, Monash University (); Professor Emeritus Ronald Rooney, Social Work Department, University of Minnesota (); and Professor Traci LaLiberte, Social Work Department, University of Minnesota, (), all of whom are well-known for their work with involuntary clients.

In May 2018, a conference on this theme was held at the Monash Centre in Prato, Italy. While delegates who presented papers at this conference have been invited to submit papers, this is an open invitation. All those interested in the themes of the Special Issue are encouraged to submit papers.

Relevant papers would address: work with involuntary clients in the range of fields referred to above; strategies for working with the involuntary, mandated, non-voluntary or resistant clients in a variety of settings; the dynamics of working with this population; the importance of building relationships; problem solving with involuntary clients; challenging involuntary clients; practice skills specific to these groups.

Guidelines for submission

Authors may submit an original article (4000–6000 words), or a Practice, Policy, and Perspectives article (1500–4000 words). For guidance on how to submit, please see www.tandfonline.com/rasw and the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA), 6th Edition.

Deadline for submission

All manuscripts should be submitted via Scholar One Manuscripts: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/rasw, no later than 30 May 2019. Authors are encouraged to contact the Guest Editors to discuss their intended submissions.

(Australian Social Worker, ©2018)

The 5th International Conference on Youth Mental Health: United for Global Change

Brisbane, 26-29 October 2019: Call for abstracts

Open until 14/12/2018 for poster, oral, tabletop or lightening presentation.

    Parental substance and alcohol abuse: publications guide

    Annotated bibliography

    Below are some citations and abstracts from publications from the library’s database:

    Arria, A. M., Mericle, A. A., Meyers, K., & Winters, K. C. (2012). Parental substance use impairment, parenting and substance use disorder risk. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 43(1), 114-122.

    Using data from a nationally representative sample, this study investigated substance use disorder (SUD) among respondents with ages 15–54 years as a function of their parents’ substance-related impairment and parents’ treatment history. In addition, associations among maternal and paternal substance-related impairment, specific parenting behaviors, and risk for SUD in the proband were examined. As expected, parental substance-related impairment was associated with SUD. Paternal treatment history was associated with a decreased risk for SUD in the proband but did not appear to be associated with positive parenting practices. Results of post hoc analyses suggested that parenting behaviors might operate differently to influence SUD risk in children where parents are affected by substance use problems compared with unaffected families. Future research is warranted to better understand the complex relationships among parental substance use, treatment, parenting behaviors, and SUD risk in offspring. Opportunities might exist within treatment settings to improve parenting skills.

    Berg, L., Bäck, K., Vinnerljung, B., & Hjern, A. (2016). Parental alcohol‐related disorders and school performance in 16‐year‐olds—a Swedish national cohort study. Addiction, 111(10), 1795-1803.:

    To study the links between parental alcoholrelated disorders and offspring school performance and, specifically, whether associations vary by gender of parent or child and whether associations are mediated by other adverse psychosocial circumstances commonly appearing together with parental alcohol problems, such as parental mental health problems or criminal behaviour. Register study in a national cohort. Sweden. A total of 740 618 individuals born in Sweden in 1990–96. Parental hospital admissions for alcoholrelated disorders and school performance in their offspring, in the final year of compulsory school at age 15–16 years was analysed in relation to sociodemographic confounders and psychosocial covariates, using linear and logistic regressions. Both mothers’ and fathers’ alcoholrelated hospital admissions were associated with lower Zscores of grades and national mathematics tests scores. After adjustment for parental education and sociodemographic confounders, betacoefficients of Zscores of grades were –0.42 [95% confidence interval (CI) = –0.45, –0.39] and –0.42 (95% CI =  –0.43, –0.40), and betacoefficients of mathematics tests scores were –0.36 (95% CI = –0.39, –0.33) and –0.31 (95% CI = –0.33, –0.29), for mothers’ and fathers’ alcoholrelated disorders, respectively. Adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for not being eligible for secondary school were 1.99 (95% CI = 1.84–2.15) and 2.04 (95% CI = 1.95–2.15) for mothers’ and fathers’ alcoholrelated disorders, respectively. Adjusting the analyses for psychosocial factors in the family almost eradicated the statistical effects of parental alcoholrelated disorders on offspring school performance to betacoefficients of 0.03 to –0.10 and ORs of 0.89–1.15. The effect of a mother’s alcoholrelated hospital admission on school performance was stronger in girls than in boys, whereas no gender differences were seen for a father’s alcoholrelated hospital admission. In Sweden, alcoholrelated disorders in both mothers and fathers are associated with lower school performance in their children at age 15–16 years, with most of the statistical effects being attributed to psychosocial circumstances of the family, such as parental psychiatric disorders, drug use and criminality and receipt of social or child welfare interventions.

    Capaldi, D. M., Tiberio, S. S., Kerr, D. C., & Pears, K. C. (2016). The relationships of parental alcohol versus tobacco and marijuana use with early adolescent onset of alcohol use. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 77(1), 95-103.

    Objective:This study examined whether the use of tobacco and marijuana by fathers or mothers predicted onset of alcohol use in their offspring over and above effects of parental alcohol use.Method:The present study included 146 children of 93 parents (90 fathers and 85 mothers). The fathers were originally recruited as boys to the Oregon Youth Study, a study of community, familial, and individual risk factors for delinquency.Results:Only mothers’ but not fathers’ alcohol use was associated with children’s age at onset. Children’s age at onset was predicted by mothers’ tobacco use and by the interaction of fathers’ marijuana use and alcohol use. These effects were observed when controlling for parental education, child’s gender, and also child’s antisocial behavior—a general developmental risk factor for substance use onset in adolescence.Conclusions:Mothers’ substance use played a major role in childhood onset of alcohol use, yet the role of maternal substance use as a risk factor for their children has previously received less attention than the role of paternal substance use. Also, findings imply that it may be important to identify children of polysubstance-using parents for targeted prevention programs.

    Chuang, E., Wells, R., Bellettiere, J., & Cross, T. P. (2013). Identifying the substance abuse treatment needs of caregivers involved with child welfare. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 45(1), 118-125.

    Parental substance use significantly increases risk of child maltreatment, but is often under-identified by child protective services. This study examined how agency use of standardized substance use assessments and child welfare investigative caseworker education, experience, and caseload affected caseworkers’ identification of parental substance abuse treatment needs. Data are from a national probability sample of permanent, primary caregivers involved with child protective services whose children initially remained at home and whose confidential responses on two validated instruments indicated harmful substance use or dependence. Investigative caseworkers reported use of a formal assessment in over two thirds of cases in which substance use was accurately identified. However, weighted logistic regression indicated that agency provision of standardized assessment instruments was not associated with caseworker identification of caregiver needs. Caseworkers were also less likely to identify substance abuse when their caseloads were high and when caregivers were fathers. Implications for agency practice are discussed.

    Douglas-Siegel, J. A., & Ryan, J. P. (2013). The effect of recovery coaches for substance-involved mothers in child welfare: Impact on juvenile delinquency. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 45(4), 381-387.

    Despite the documented relationship between parental substance abuse and youth delinquency, the effects of parental interventions on delinquency outcomes are unknown. Such interventions are particularly vital for families in the child welfare system who are at heightened risk for both parental substance involvement and youth delinquency. The current study tested the impact of intensive case management in the form of a recovery coach for substance-involved mothers on youth delinquency outcomes among a randomized sample of 453 families involved in a Title IV-E experimental waiver demonstration in Cook County, Illinois. In comparison to control group participants, families enrolled in the Alcohol and Other Drug Abuse (AODA) waiver demonstration experienced a lower rate of juvenile arrest, net of factors such as demographic characteristics, primary drug of choice, and time spent in substitute care. Findings support efforts to curb delinquency among child-welfare involved youth by providing recovery coaches to their substance abusing or dependent parents.

    Handley, E. D., & Chassin, L. (2013). Alcohol-specific parenting as a mechanism of parental drinking and alcohol use disorder risk on adolescent alcohol use onset. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 74(5), 684-693.

    Objective:The primary aim of the current study was to examine three dimensions of alcohol-specific parenting (anti-alcohol parenting strategies, parental legitimacy in regulating adolescent drinking, and parental disclosure of negative alcohol experiences) as mechanisms in the prospective relations between parental drinking and alcohol use disorder (recovered, current, and never diagnosed) and adolescent alcohol use initiation.Method:Participants were from an ongoing longitudinal study of the intergenerational transmission of alcoholism. Structural equation modeling was used to test a maternal model (n= 268 adolescents and their mothers) and a paternal model (n= 204 adolescents and their fathers) of alcohol-specific parenting.Results:Results indicated that higher levels of drinking among mothers and current alcohol use disorder among fathers were related to more frequent parental disclosure of personal negative experiences with alcohol. Maternal disclosure of negative alcohol experiences mediated the effect of maternal drinking on adolescent onset of alcohol use such that more disclosure predicted a greater likelihood of adolescent drinking initiation at follow-up over and above general parenting. In addition, currently alcoholic mothers were perceived as having less legitimate authority to regulate adolescent drinking, and low levels of legitimacy among fathers was predictive of drinking onset among adolescents.Conclusions:Alcohol-specific parenting is a distinct and influential predictor of adolescent alcohol use initiation that is partially shaped by parents’ own drinking experiences. Moreover, parental conversations about their own personal experiences with alcohol may not represent a form of parent–child communication about drinking that deters adolescent drinking.

    Hedges, K. E. (2012). A family affair: contextual accounts from addicted youth growing up in substance using families. Journal of Youth Studies, 15(3), 257-272.

    There are currently over 8 million children in the USA living in households where at least one parent is dependent on or abusing substances. Research has shown a link between parental substance use and children initiating substance use. This article uses qualitative data to give a contextual understanding of the experience of growing up in substance using homes. Results found that the habitusof homes was so immersed in substances that children’s initiation into substance use was expected and became a ‘rite of passage’ into full acceptance as an adult member of the family. Furthermore, in many cases youth described a role reversal between child and parent roles or parentification in the family. The conclusion calls for early identification in treatment of youth who use substances with family members to target new norms and behaviors for the entire family posttreatment and to enhance successful recovery when returning to the family.

    McCutcheon, V. V., Agrawal, A., Kuo, S. I. C., Su, J., Dick, D. M., Meyers, J. L., … & Schuckit, M. A. (2018). Associations of parental alcohol use disorders and parental separation with offspring initiation of alcohol, cigarette and cannabis use and sexual debut in high‐risk families. Addiction, 113(2), 336-345.

    Parental alcohol use disorders (AUDs) and parental separation are associated with increased risk for early use of alcohol in offspring, but whether they increase risks for early use of other substances and for early sexual debut is understudied. We focused on associations of parental AUDs and parental separation with substance initiation and sexual debut to (1) test the strength of the associations of parental AUDs and parental separation with time to initiation (age in years) of alcohol, tobacco and cannabis use and sexual debut and (2) compare the strength of association of parental AUD and parental separation with initiation. Prospective adolescent and young adult cohort of a highrisk family study, the Collaborative Study on the Genetics of Alcoholism (COGA). Six sites in the United States. A total of 3257 offspring (aged 14–33 years) first assessed in 2004 and sought for interview approximately every 2 years thereafter; 1945 (59.7%) offspring had a parent with an AUD. Diagnostic interview data on offspring substance use and sexual debut were based on first report of these experiences. Parental lifetime AUD was based on their own selfreport when parents were interviewed (1991–2005) for most parents, or on offspring and other family member reports for parents who were not interviewed. Parental separation was based on offspring reports of not living with both biological parents most of the time between ages 12 and 17 years. Parental AUDs were associated with increased hazards for all outcomes, with cumulative hazards ranging from 1.19 to 2.71. Parental separation was also an independent and consistent predictor of early substance use and sexual debut, with hazards ranging from 1.19 to 2.34. The strength of association of parental separation with substance initiation was equal to that of having two AUDaffected parents, and its association with sexual debut was stronger than the association of parental AUD in one or both parents. Parental alcohol use disorders (AUDs) and parental separation are independent and consistent predictors of increased risk for early alcohol, tobacco and cannabis use and sexual debut in offspring from families with a high risk of parental AUDs.

    Meyers, J. L., Shmulewitz, D., Elliott, J. C., Thompson, R. G., Aharonovich, E., Spivak, B., … & Hasin, D. S. (2014). Parental alcohol history differentially predicts offspring disorders in distinct subgroups in Israel. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 75(5), 859-869.

    Objective:The association between alcoholism in parents and related disorders in their offspring is well established in cultures with intermediate/high alcohol consumption, but not in those with low consumption, such as Israel. This study investigated differences in parental transmission of alcohol problems and related psychopathology between immigrants from the former Soviet Union (FSU) to Israel and other Israelis—two Israeli subgroups with differing alcohol consumption behaviors and social norms.Method:A total of 1,347 adults from a household sample were interviewed. Regression analyses were used to examine associations between parental alcohol problems and participant disorders: alcohol, nicotine, and cannabis use disorders (AUD, NUD, CUD); antisocial personality disorder (ASPD); major depressive disorder (MDD); and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). We also examined the associations of parental alcohol problems with participant disorders characterized with two latent factors: externalizing (EXT: AUD, NUD, CUD, ASPD) and internalizing (INT: MDD, PTSD). Differential parental transmission of alcohol problems in FSU (n= 315) and non-FSU (n= 1,032) Israelis was examined with statistical interaction.Results:Among emigrants from the FSU, parental alcohol problems predicted AUD, NUD, CUD, ASPD, PTSD, EXT, and INT (mean ratios = 1.38–4.83). In non-FSU Israelis, parental alcohol problems predicted only ASPD and PTSD (mean ratios = 1.08–4.09). Significant interactions were observed for AUD, CUD, PTSD, and EXT; each relationship was stronger in FSU Israelis and null (AUD, CUD, EXT) or less robust (PTSD) in other Israelis.Conclusions:Parental alcohol problems were related to substance use and psychiatric disorders differently in FSU and other Israelis, two groups with different alcohol consumption levels and drinking norms. We propose that, in social contexts that vary in the degree to which they constrain alcohol behavior, underlying genetic predispositions may manifest as different disorders.

    Moreland, A. D., & McRae-Clark, A. (2018). Parenting outcomes of parenting interventions in integrated substance-use treatment programs: A systematic review. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 89, 52-59.:

    The high prevalence of women in substance use treatment programs with children, and the co-occurring negative physical and mental health outcomes associated with substance use, led to the development of integrated substance use treatment programs that target a range of women-specific issues. Integrated programs typically offer some type of parenting component, although the level of parenting services varies widely. Existing reviews have found positive child and parent outcomes following integrated treatment programs in general, although studies were not selected on the basis of whether they included parenting interventions. Due to the large percentage of substance using parents and research that parenting interventions contribute to decreased maternal substance use, this critical review examines parental outcomes of published studies on integrated programs that specifically include a parenting intervention component, as well as moderators of parenting and parental substance use/relapse. Across the 15 studies identified, this systematic review primarily focused on 8 parenting outcomes, including program retention, substance use, parenting stress, psychosocial adjustment, depression, child abuse potential, parenting behaviors, and parent-child interaction; as well as 5 additional secondary outcomes. The review discusses results on each of these outcomes, as well as retention rates across the parenting interventions.

    Rossow, I., Felix, L., Keating, P., & McCambridge, J. (2016). Parental drinking and adverse outcomes in children: A scoping review of cohort studies. Drug and Alcohol Review, 35(4), 397-405.

    There is a growing interest in measuring alcohol’s harms to people other than the drinker themselves. ‘Children of alcoholics’ and foetal alcohol spectrum disorder have received widespread attention. Less is known about how children are affected by postnatal exposure to parental drinking other than alcohol abuse/dependence. In this scoping review, we aim to assemble and map existing evidence from cohort studies on the consequences of parental alcohol use for children, and to identify limitations and gaps in this literature. Systematic review methods were used. Electronic databases were searched (1980 to October 2013) and a total of 3215 abstracts were screened, 326 full text papers examined and 99 eligible for inclusion according to selection criteria including separation of exposure and outcome measurement in time and report of a quantitative effect size. The main finding is the large literature available. Adolescent drinking behaviour was the most common outcome measure and outcomes other than substance use were rarely analysed. In almost two of every three published associations, parental drinking was found to be statistically significantly associated with a child harm outcome measure. Several limitations in the literature are noted regarding its potential to address a possible causal role of parental drinking in children’s adverse outcomes. This study identifies targets for further study and provides a platform for more targeted analytic investigations which ascertain risk of bias, and which are capable of considering the appropriateness of causal inferences for the observed associations.

    Thompson Jr, R. G., Alonzo, D., Hu, M. C., & Hasin, D. S. (2017). The influences of parental divorce and maternal‐versus‐paternal alcohol abuse on offspring lifetime suicide attempt. Drug and Alcohol Review, 36(3), 408-414

    Research indicates that parental divorce and parental alcohol abuse independently increase likelihood of offspring lifetime suicide attempt. However, when experienced together, only parental alcohol abuse significantly increased odds of suicide attempt. It is unclear to what extent differences in the effect of maternal versus paternal alcohol use exist on adult offspring lifetime suicide attempt risk. This study examined the influences of parental divorce and maternal–paternal histories of alcohol problems on adult offspring lifetime suicide attempt. The sample consisted of participants from the 2001–2002 National Epidemiological Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. The simultaneous effect of childhood or adolescent parental divorce and maternal and paternal history of alcohol problems on offspring lifetime suicide attempt was estimated using a logistic regression model with an interaction term for demographics and parental history of other emotional and behavioural problems. Parental divorce and maternal–paternal alcohol problems interacted to differentially influence the likelihood of offspring lifetime suicide attempt. Experiencing parental divorce and either maternal or paternal alcohol problems nearly doubled the likelihood of suicide attempt. Divorce and history of alcohol problems for both parents tripled the likelihood. Individuals who experienced parental divorce as children or adolescents and who have a parent who abuses alcohol are at elevated risk for lifetime suicide attempt. These problem areas should become a routine part of assessment to better identify those at risk for lifetime suicide attempt and to implement early and targeted intervention to decrease such risk. 4.

    Waldron, M., Bucholz, K. K., Lynskey, M. T., Madden, P. A., & Heath, A. C. (2013). Alcoholism and timing of separation in parents: Findings in a midwestern birth cohort. Journal of Studies on Alcohol and Drugs, 74(2), 337-348.

    Objective:We examined history of alcoholism and occurrence and timing of separation in parents of a female twin cohort.Method:Parental separation (never-together; never-married cohabitants who separated; married who separated) was predicted from maternal and paternal alcoholism in 326 African ancestry (AA) and 1,849 European/other ancestry (EA) families. Broad (single-informant, reported in abstract) and narrow (self-report or two-informant) measures of alcoholism were compared.Results:Parental separation was more common in families with parental alcoholism: By the time twins were 18 years of age, parents had separated in only 24% of EA families in which neither parent was alcoholic, contrasted with 58% of families in which only the father was (father-only), 61% of families in which only the mother was (mother-only), and 75% in which both parents were alcoholic (two-parent); corresponding AA percentages were 59%, 71%, 82%, and 86%, respectively. Maternal alcoholism was more common in EA never-together couples (mother-only: odds ratio [OR] = 5.95; two parent: OR = 3.69). In ever-together couples, alcoholism in either parent predicted elevated risk of separation, with half of EA relationships ending in separation within 12 years of twins’ birth for father-only families, 9 years for mother-only families, and 4 years for both parents alcoholic; corresponding median survival times for AA couples were 9, 4, and 2 years, respectively. EA maternal alcoholism was especially strongly associated with separation in the early postnatal years (mother-only: birth—5 years, hazard ratio [HR] = 4.43; 6 years on, HR = 2.52; two-parent: HRs = 5.76, 3.68, respectively).Conclusions:Parental separation is a childhood environmental exposure that is more common in children of alcoholics, with timing of separation highly dependent on alcoholic parent gender.

     

    October PD Blog

    Professional development

    You can add to the professional development post by commenting below or emailing the library.

    Online resources

    Webpage

    The Healing Foundation has a website linking to resources about intergenerational trauma in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders.

    Read – professional reading

    Available from the library database

    Armstrong, G., Spittal, M. J., & Jorm, A. F. (2018). Are we underestimating the suicide rate of middle and older‐aged Indigenous Australians? An interaction between ‘unknown’Indigenous status and age. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health.

    Barnett, A. I., Hall, W., Fry, C. L., Dilkes‐Frayne, E., & Carter, A. (2017). Drug and alcohol treatment providers’ views about the disease model of addiction and its impact on clinical practice: A systematic review. Drug and Alcohol Review.

    Hunt, G., Antin, T., Sanders, E., & Sisneros, M. (2018). Queer youth, intoxication and queer drinking spaces. Journal of Youth Studies, 1-21.

    Kristjansson, A. L., Kogan, S. M., Mann, M. J., Smith, M. L., Juliano, L. M., Lilly, C. L., & James, J. E. (2018). Does early exposure to caffeine promote smoking and alcohol use behavior? A prospective analysis of middle school students. Addiction.

    McCann, T. V., & Lubman, D. I. (2018). Help-seeking barriers and facilitators for affected family members of a relative with alcohol and other drug misuse: A qualitative study. Journal of Substance Abuse Treatment, 93, 7-14.

    Wakeford, G., Kannis‐Dymand, L., & Statham, D. (2018). Anger rumination, binge eating, and at‐risk alcohol use in a university sample. Australian Journal of Psychology, 70(3), 269-276.

    Open Access Articles

    Bryant, L., Garnham, B., Tedmanson, D., & Diamandi, S. (2018). Tele-social work and mental health in rural and remote communities in Australia. International Social Work, 61(1), 143-155.

    Lamont-Mills, A., Christensen, S., & Moses, L. (2018). Confidentiality and informed consent in counselling and psychotherapy: a systematic review. Melbourne: PACFA.

    Petrakis, M., Robinson, R., Myers, K., Kroes, S., & O’Connor, S. (2018). Dual diagnosis competencies: A systematic review of staff training literature. Addictive Behaviors Reports, 7, 53-57.

    Roberts, R. M., Ong, N. W. Y., & Raftery, J. (2018). Factors That Inhibit and Facilitate Wellbeing and Effectiveness in Counsellors Working With Refugees and Asylum Seekers in Australia. Journal of Pacific Rim Psychology, 12.

    Tsou, C., Green, C., Gray, G., & Thompson, S. C. (2018). Using the Healthy Community Assessment Tool: Applicability and Adaptation in the Midwest of Western Australia. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 15(6).

    Useful resources

    Insight have produced several toolkits of resources for use by workers including:

    AOD Literacy Toolkit  

    First Nations AOD Toolkit

    The 2018 Global Drug Survey has just been released

    e-Book of the month

    Bukowski, W. M., Laursen, B. P., & Rubin, K. H. (2018). Handbook of Peer Interactions, Relationships, and Groups, Second Edition. New York: The Guilford Press.

    The definitive handbook on peer relations has now been significantly revised with 55% new material. Bringing together leading authorities, this volume presents cutting-edge research on the dynamics of peer interactions, their impact on multiple aspects of social development, and the causes and consequences of peer difficulties. From friendships and romance to social withdrawal, aggression, and victimization, all aspects of children’s and adolescents’  relationships are explored. The book examines how individual characteristics interact with family, group, and contextual factors across development to shape social behavior. The importance of peer relationships to emotional competence, psychological well-being, and achievement is analyzed, and peer-based interventions for those who are struggling are reviewed. Each chapter includes an introductory overview and addresses theoretical considerations, measures and methods, research findings and their implications, and future directions (from publisher).

    Attend – informal learning sessions, journal club, seminar series

    Insight Queensland

    Free training sessions at Biala Community Health Centre in Brisbane, unless otherwise specified including:

    Online induction modules are a prerequisite to some of the courses. To access and download them visit www.insightqld.org

    5 October, 08:30-16:00: Introduction to Motivational Interviewing – Townsville. Prerequisite Module 5

    9 October, 09:00-16:30: “AOD Crash Course” – Introduction to Working with People who use Substances – Logan

    9 October, 09:00-16:30: “AOD Crash Course” – Introduction to Working with People who use Substances – Brisbane

    11 October, 09:00-16:30: Introduction to AOD Clinical Supervision – Brisbane

    12 October, 09:00-16:30: Introduction to Motivational Interviewing – Gold Coast. Prerequisite Module 5

    16 October, 09:00-16:30: Advanced Harm Reduction – Brisbane. NB: Participants must have completed Insight’s “Understanding Psychoactive Drugs” workshop or be an existing employee of an AOD or Mental Health service to be eligible for this workshop.

    18 October, 09:00-16:30: Introduction to Motivational Interviewing – Sunshine Coast. Prerequisite Module 5

    18 October, 09:00-16:30: Family Inclusive Practice in AOD Treatment – Brisbane

    23 October, 09:00-16:30: Introduction to Withdrawal Management – Logan

    23 October, 09:00-16:30: Case Formulation – Brisbane

    25 October, 09:00-16:30: Introduction to Motivational Interviewing – Logan. Prerequisite Module 5

    25 October, 09:00-16:30: Advanced Harm Reduction – Ipswich. NB: Participants must have completed Insight’s “Understanding Psychoactive Drugs” workshop or be an existing employee of an AOD or Mental Health service to be eligible for this workshop.

    25 October, 09:00-16:30: AOD Relapse Prevention and Management – Brisbane. Prerequisite Module 6

    30 October, 09:00-16:30: “AOD Crash Course” – Introduction to Working with People who use Substances –  Toowoomba

    30 October, 09:00-16:30: Advanced Harm Reduction – Logan. NB: Participants must have completed Insight’s “Understanding Psychoactive Drugs” workshop or be an existing employee of an AOD or Mental Health service to be eligible for this workshop.

    Listen – podcasts, webinars

    Cracks in the Ice

    Supporting frontline workers with information and resources about crystal methamphetamine. 17 October, 11:00-12:00 AEST

    Presented by Allan Trifonoff and Roger Nicholas, National Centre for Education and Training on Addiction (NCETA), Flinders University

    This webinar will provide attendees with information about
    – How ice affects people and communities
    – Worker safety and preventing, managing and recovering from ice-related critical incidents
    – The impacts of using ice with alcohol and other drugs

    Register here

    Past Cracks in the Ice webinars are available here

    Insight

    Free webinars at 10:00-11:00 AEST:

    10 October: The Great Vape Debate

    17 October: FASD as an Indigenous Rights Issue

    24 October: HIV Prevention and U=U

    31 October: Becoming a Trauma Informed Clinician- Taming the Inner Chimp by Talking to the Elephant in the Room

    Past Insight webinar recordings available now on YouTube